STUDENT NEWS

MONDAY 11 MAY

Six reasons why Winter School is cool 

The University of Sydney’s Winter School enrolments open today. The four-week program runs from 29 June to 24 July and offers more than 50 subjects. So, if you’ve never considered studying out of semester, here are six good reasons why you may want to warm up to Winter School...
The University of Sydney’s Winter School enrolments open today. The four-week program runs from 29 June to 24 July and offers more than 50 subjects. So, if you’ve never considered studying out of semester, here are six good reasons why you may want to warm up to Winter School...
  1. Speed up your degree
    Completing subjects at Winter School means you can reduce the overall length of your degree, so you can get that gown on sooner!

  2. Try, try again
    If you didn’t fare so well in a subject one semester, the Winter School can give you the chance to go back and have another crack at it.

  3. Lighten your workload
    juggling four or more subjects in one semester can get intense. Why not spread it out over the year and knock over some credit points in winter?

  4. More room for activities
    Smaller classes sizes and a less-crowded campus means Winter School offers a more relaxed and engaging environment to learn in. It’s a shorter line-up for a hot chocolate, too. 
     
  5. Try something new
    Winter School gives you the freedom to explore courses outside your current degree. You can learn a language, or delve deeper into a personal area of interest. Diversifying your learning is always a good idea, and it gives you a taste of future study possibilities.

  6. Travel!
    The Winter School has subjects you can add to your Sydney Abroad program. You can enrol in Winter School and study on the other side of the world, where it’s actually summer. Nice.
There are many good reasons to enrol at Winter School this year. Fee help is available to domestic students, and cross-institutional students are welcome. 

Find out more
 

Beat assessment stress

As we approach the business end of semester 1, when assignments and exams begin to rear their heads, it's not unusual to feel like pressure is piling up. Feeling stressed at this time of year is normal, but there are ways to prevent yourself getting overwhelmed, so you can perform to your full potential. Check out Counselling and Psychology Service's new student advice blog, CAPStivate for some tips to beat the stress.

Sydney to Brussels in two hours – PhD students join mission for hypersonic flight

Two aeronautical engineering PhD students from the University of Sydney have joined a European Space Agency (ESA)-led project to help bring hypersonic planes closer to lift-off.
Two aeronautical engineering PhD students from the University of Sydney have joined a European Space Agency (ESA)-led project to help bring hypersonic planes closer to lift-off.

As part of their Honours theses, David Munk and Jonathan Jeyaratnam came up with concepts and designs for parts of a plane that could theoretically fly at more than seven times the speed of sound – allowing a passenger taking off from Sydney to touch down in Europe just two hours later.

Their radical ideas impressed the ESA so much that they invited the students to join the international HEXAFLY-INT collaboration, which aims to have a sub-scale model of a futuristic hypersonic plane in the air by 2019.

David and Jonathan, along with their supervisors Dr Gareth Vio and Dr Dries Verstraete, will collaborate with aerospace researchers from around the world on particular elements of the experimental design.

Extreme heat is one of the first challenges according to David.  

“An aircraft experiences high thermal stresses and a significant reduction in material strength and stiffness when it is taking off or flying at supersonic speeds,” he says.

"To combat this reduction in strength and rigidity I am designing an optimal algorithm that will determine the best structural layout for such craft”.

Jonathan meanwhile is examining how the aerodynamic design of hypersonic craft will handle the very different low-speed flows experienced at take-off and landing.

"The aerodynamics of a hypersonic plane is very different to a standard civil aircraft" says Jonathan who will build a low-speed model for testing at the University's Marulan airstrip.

"I'm looking at the variation in the sizing, positioning and dihedral (upward) angle of the vertical tail to find out if their positioning can improve the lateral stability but not compromise performance of a craft that travels at Mach 7,” he says.

Find out more

Sydney Film Festival comes home to campus

Did you know the University of Sydney hosted the very first Sydney Film Festival back in 1954? No? Well this Thursday, we're bringing it back for a special on-campus showcase event with festival director Nashen Moodley.
Did you know the University of Sydney hosted the very first Sydney Film Festival back in 1954? No? Well this Thursday, we're bringing it back for a special on-campus showcase event with festival director Nashen Moodley.

Moodley will be in-conversation with an as yet unnamed filmmaker, talking all things film and the exciting events ahead in this years' Sydney Film Festival program, which runs from 3 to 14 June. 

When: Thursday 14 May, 1–2pm
Where: Old Geology Lecture Theatre, Edgeworth David Building, Science Road

Free event, find out more.

This event is part of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences' sponsorship of the Sydney Film Festival in 2015. Find out more about Curiosity Season at the University of Sydney.

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STUDENT LIFE

 USU  | Health & Wellbeing Day is coming (again)

Now that the wild wind and torrential rain is behind us, the University of Sydney Union (USU) is happy to announce a new date for the annual Health and Wellbeing Day – Wednesday 13 May! Get active with morning yoga, enjoy healthy food samples, join friendly a game of soccer or Quidditch, and learn to cook healthy meals on a budget. Find out more

 VIVID  | Creative conversations at Vivid Ideas + ticket giveaway

Quench your curiosity at Vivid Ideas, where Sydney Ideas and Vivid Sydney combine with a series of forums that light up creative conversations. Join the debate about the future of music and technology with an interactive exhibition on music and gaming; and partake in an open discussion about racism in Australia, at the NSW Reconciliation Council’s annual forum 'I'm Not Racist, But...'. The yearly forum has a reputation for being sometimes controversial, often funny and always enlightening and we have tickets to give away!

Quench your curiosity at Vivid Ideas, where Sydney Ideas and Vivid Sydney combine with a series of forums that light up creative conversations. Join the debate about the future of music and technology with an interactive exhibition on music and gaming; and partake in an open discussion about racism in Australia, at the NSW Reconciliation Council’s annual forum 'I'm Not Racist, But...'. The yearly forum has a reputation for being sometimes controversial, often funny and always enlightening and we have tickets to give away!

The Future of Music: how interactive technologies are changing music experience
When:
Tuesday 26 May, 6.30–7.30pm
Where:
Sound Lounge, Seymour Centre
The Future of Music brings together practitioners and thinkers from different worlds of music and digital design to reimagine what music is and discuss where its future may lie. Stay around after the panel for a viewing of an interactive exhibition, exploring the intersection of music and games.

I'm Not Racist, But... 2015
When:
Friday 29 May, 6.30–8pm
Where:
Great Hall
The NSW Reconciliation Council’s sell-out event I’m Not Racist, But... is back in 2015. This interactive forum aims to generate an open discussion around racism in Australia. This year, the conversation will focus on identity and creativity. What role does race play in the creative arts? How can artists celebrate but not be limited by culture and difference? Panellists include columnist Benjamin Law; tv presenter Yumi Stynes; actor Nakkiah Lui and artist Adam Geczy. Hosted by Gretel Kileen with a performance by local band, The Answers.

For you chance to win one of five double-passes to this event, simply email: sydney.ideas@sydney.edu.au and tell us: “Who will host this year’s I’m Not Racist, But… event?”

Be sure to include your student number and contact details. Entries close 5pm Wednesday 13 May, and winners will be notified by 5pm on Thursday 14 May. 

Find out more about Vivid Ideas and the University’s Curiosity Season.


Meet the USU Board candidates
This year, 13 candidates are running for six available places on the University of Sydney Union student board. Come and meet them at tomorrow's election soapbox – hear them speak about their ideas for the future of the USU and ask them questions to help you decide who to vote for.

Each year, USU members are asked to vote for the students they think should shape the direction of the organisation. Collectively, student board directors are responsible for governing the USU, developing and reviewing policies, improving programs and services, creating new spaces and managing the USU’s finances. 

When: Tuesday 12 May, 12:45pm
Where: Manning Bar

Find out more
Catch TEDxSydney on campus
Join us this curiosity season and learn a thing or two from Charles Darwin’s great great grandson; controversial brain surgeon Dr Charlie Teo, along with an outback-based transgender social worker, a death-row lawyer and an undefeated champion kickboxer, all on a live stream direct from Sydney Opera House.

TEDxSydney 2015 is bigger and better this year with an extraordinary line up of Australians set to take stage to share their stories and ideas. As principal partner of TEDxSydney 2015, we don’t want you, our curious, creative community to miss out. 

TEDxSydney on-campus satellite event
When: Thursday 21 May,9am-6pm
Where: New Law Lawns

Find out more about Curiosity Season at the University of Sydney

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GET INVOLVED

 PG WEEK  | Is postgraduate study right for you?

Is staying on at university to do postgraduate study is worth the time, money and commitment? If you’re keen to take your career to a new level, pursue your passion or challenge yourself - then the answer is yes.

Is staying on at university to do postgraduate study is worth the time, money and commitment? If you’re keen to take your career to a new level, pursue your passion or challenge yourself - then the answer is yes.

The University’s Postgraduate Week begins next Monday 18 May and is your chance to learn about the huge benefits postgraduate study can give your career, such as improved employment and salary prospects.

Unemployment for postgrads is as low as 3.5 percent according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, while the University’s 2013 Graduate Destination report found median full-time salaries for postgraduates in areas of science, health and arts was around $20,000 higher than undergraduates.

 “Postgraduate degrees add value to a person’s ambitions in two ways,’’ says Professor Duncan Ivison, Dean of Arts and Social Sciences. ‘‘First, they allow for a person with a bachelor degree to have another layer of specialisation that companies are looking for; second, a postgraduate qualification can be a way of making a big career change.”

The University of Sydney’s postgraduate community is the largest in Australia, with more than 450 courses to choose from. Join us at our information events and hear from academics, alumni and experts from the University’s Career Centre to find out how postgraduate study can boost your future prospects and take your achievements to places you never imagined.

Register your place now before they book out

Postgraduate Information Evening for Science, Technology and Engineering
Tuesday 19 May, 5.30–7.30pm 

Postgraduate Medicine and Health Careers and Research Evening
Wednesday 20 May, 4–7pm

The University of Sydney Business School Information Session
Thursday 21 May, 12.30–2pm 

Postgraduate Information Evening for Business, Law, Humanities, Social Sciences and Creative Arts
Thursday 21 May, 5.30–7.30pm

Find out more about postgraduate study at the University of Sydney


New Colombo Plan applications close soon

Hurry, applications close this Thursday 14 May for 2016 New Colombo Plan mobility grants and scholarships. Gain invaluable experience studying abroad in the Indo-Pacific region next year. Find out more
What are your thoughts about food and drink on campus?
What's your opinion about the food and drink on our University campuses? Hungry for more salad bars or burger joints? Craving a frozen yoghurt outlet? 

Take the Healthy Sydney University food choices online survey and let us know your thoughts. It's a brief, 10-minute questionaire and you can go into the running to win one of six Coles Myer gift cards.

Take the survey
Passionate about research? Shine as an undergraduate researcher in 2015
Are you passionate about research? Want to share your research ideas with talented and curious undergraduates across Australia? Applications are now open for the Undergraduate Research Conference Support Scheme (URCSS).

If you are an undergraduate coursework student, you can apply for funding to present an interesting research project at the 2015 Australian Conference for Undergraduate Research (ACUR) in Perth in September.

You will also need the support (and advice) of the lecturer or unit of study coordinator responsible for the research you’ve engaged in. We not only fund you but we also fund them to go along with you!

The application process involves a number of steps:
  1. A 300-word abstract (a summary of your research) must be submitted to the ACUR conference before Monday 1 June 2015
  2. If the abstract is successful, you can apply for the URCSS closing on Monday 20 July 2015 (the support of the lecturer or unit coordinator is a requirement of the scheme)
  3. If you are successful you will be notified by Friday 31 July 2015
  4. ACUR conference held on 29-30 September
Find out more.

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NOTICES

Thinking about changing courses?
Whether you are new to the University or you have completed a few semesters, if you are a current undergraduate student and you are thinking about moving from one Bachelor degree course to another, you can now apply directly to the University. You will no longer be required to apply through UAC and there is no application fee attached. A list of courses is available here.

For some courses, course transfer can be completed within the faculty, so speak to your faculty first and read the important information here before you start filling in the application form. Applications close on Friday 17 July, 2015. If you already have an application with UAC, you don’t have to apply to the University.  

PNR Learning Hub now open 24 hours
The PNR Learning Hub now has 24-hour access via your student swipe card.

Now, you can access the hub's many resources at any time, including:
  • virtual desktop enabled computers
  • pods
  • printing and scanning services
  • wi-fi internet access
  • power points for charging mobile devices
  • support staff, to provide general IT support as well as help familiarise you with the new technology available.
Find out more

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EVENTS

 12 MAY  | Discover the power of a PhD

 18-22 MAY  | Postgraduate Week

 19 MAY  | Sydney Ideas – Key Texts Series: Picasso’s Guernica

 20 MAY  | Sydney Ideas – Health forums: The dementia epidemic

 20 MAY  | Your Path to Sydney Uni 2015 – information evening for students and parents

 21 MAY  | TEDxSydney on-campus satellite event

 25 MAY  | Sydney Ideas – Competing Voices: The status of Indigenous languages in the French Pacific and Australia

 26 MAY  | Police violence and protest in America: what it means for Australia

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