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JULY 2012
WELCOME
Postdoctoral fellows
Dr James Van Dyke
Van joins Professor Mike Thompson’s laboratory on a National Science Foundation fellowship. Van has moved from Virginia Tech where he has been working as a postdoctoral fellow. ‘I am particularly interested in examining how animals allocate energy and nutrients to their offspring, especially within the context of global climate change,’ he said.
Dr James Van Dyke
Van joins Professor Mike Thompson’s laboratory on a National Science Foundation fellowship. Van has moved from Virginia Tech where he has been working as a postdoctoral fellow. ‘I am particularly interested in examining how animals allocate energy and nutrients to their offspring, especially within the context of global climate change,’ he said.

Whilst at the School of Biological Sciences, he will be investigating the evolution and function of placental tissues in viviparous skinks.  Van said, ‘ I am interested in using stable isotopes and microscopy to examine how skinks transfer nutrients to developing offspring, and compare those mechanisms to what is known of placental function in mammals.’  And as to why he chose Sydney, he says, ‘Mike Thompson is a pioneer in this field, and coming here to work with him was a natural fit.’

Van completed a BSc at the Florida Institute of Technology. After his BSc, he completed a PhD at the University of Arkansas, where he investigated the pathways of reproductive allocation in viviparous snakes. Van also examined the metabolic costs of reproduction in snakes, and worked on a side project investigating the functions of residual yolk in soft-shelled turtles. Then, at Virginia Tech, his work focused on examining the effects of a coal ash spill on reproduction and hatchling survival in turtles.

Whilst in Australia, in addition to his scientific work, Van is hoping to ‘have a good time!’
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Dr Yoshinobu Hayashi
Dr Yoshinobu Hayashi is joining Dr Nate Lo’s laboratory on a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) fellowship. Yoshinobu is interested in the complex societies of termites. Whilst in Sydney, he plans to continue his investigation of how and why "complex" termites evolved from "simple" cockroaches.
Dr Yoshinobu Hayashi
Dr Yoshinobu Hayashi is joining Dr Nate Lo’s laboratory on a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) fellowship. Yoshinobu is interested in the complex societies of termites. Whilst in Sydney, he plans to continue his investigation of how and why "complex" termites evolved from "simple" cockroaches.

Yoshinobu received his PhD from Ibaraki University in 2006 for his study on the ecology and genetics of a Japanese termite species. Then he worked in the Center for Genomic Medicine at the RIKEN Yokohama Institute and later the National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences. Yoshinobu then joined Hokkaido University as a JSPS post-doctoral research fellow. A position he has held for the last three years.

His postdoctoral project at Hokkaido University was to reveal the genes which influence developmental fate of individuals in termites. That is, king or queen vs worker caste. He is now continuing in this project using the next generation DNA sequencers.
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FAREWELL
Dr Bruce Lyon
Bruce left the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Sydney at the end of June. Bruce had been with the School for the last 20 years. He leaves a legacy, not only through his undergraduate teaching but also through his PhD students who have gone on to positions at CSIRO and around the world.
Bruce left the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Sydney at the end of June. Bruce had been with the School for the last 20 years. He leaves a legacy, not only through his undergraduate teaching but also through his PhD students who have gone on to positions at CSIRO and around the world.

The Head of School in particular wanted to thank Bruce for his work in the School of Biological Sciences, especially in the teaching of genetics and molecular biology. ‘He is always careful and thorough’, she said. Bruce chaired the School examiners meeting for many years and had recently been chair of the Undergraduate Studies Committee in the Faculty.
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Dr Trevor Wilson
Trevor left the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Sydney at the end of June. He leaves to take up a post-doctoral fellowship at the Royal Botanical Gardens and Domain.
Trevor left the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Sydney at the end of June. He leaves to take up a post-doctoral fellowship at the Royal Botanical Gardens and Domain. Trevor has been working on the First Year Biology Human Biology course and will be missed by all, especially those of us in the Carslaw Building. For more information about Trevor’s new post, please read this news article on the School’s website.
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CONGRATULATIONS
Professor Rick Shine
Our congratulations this month must go to Professor Rick Shine for his profile in Science Magazine (see the media section for an article entitled ‘The Reluctant Toad Killer’).  Rick also endured the early starts of breakfast TV to spread his toad tadpole catching message.
Our congratulations this month must go to Professor Rick Shine for his profile in Science Magazine (see the media section for an article entitled ‘The Reluctant Toad Killer’). Rick also endured the early starts of breakfast TV to spread his toad tadpole catching message.

Yet more congratulations for Rick’s honorary member award from the Ecological Society of America. Their citation reads, ‘Rick Shine is internationally recognized as a leading authority on the ecology and evolutionary biology of reptiles and amphibians. His over 700 research publications include landmark studies that provide new insights into how Australian ecosystems function.’ And for his success Rick says, ‘God Bless the cane toad’.
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THANKS
Associate Professor Claire McArthur
The new intermediate undergraduate biology courses have now been approved and thanks for this must go to Clare. She has been working hard through the negotiation process, in particular, in finalising changes to pre-requisites. Thanks!
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NOTICES
Change Management Update
After some thoughtful feedback at the end of June, the Formal Implementation Plan for the change management process has been developed. The Formal Change Proposal and Formal Implementation Proposal have been sent to the Dean, Professor Trevor Hambley.
Warrah Open Day
In early June Professor Robyn Overall spoke to the Pearl Beach Progress Association about the work carried out at the field station ‘Warrah’. Bee genetics, pollination, and the fate of native prey at the hands (paws?) of invasive predators were just some projects presented.
In early June Professor Robyn Overall spoke to the Pearl Beach Progress Association about the work carried out at the field station ‘Warrah’. Bee genetics, pollination, and the fate of native prey at the hands (paws?) of invasive predators were just some projects presented.  The Association expressed a wish to engage more closely with activities at the field station and proposed an Open Day on Sunday 19 August.

Volunteers are needed for this fantastic outreach opportunity to proceed. If you are willing and available please contact Cecily Oakley (cecily.oakley@sydney.edu.au).
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CONTENTS
Welcome
Farewell
Congratulations
Thanks
Notices
Celebrating 50 Years: old lab, new lab
Media
Events
Stay connected
CELEBRATING 50 YEARS: OLD LAB, NEW LAB
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Preparations for the Meaning of Life exhibition at the Macleay Museum continue apace. This last week saw a troop of organisers traipsing through teaching labs on the lookout for vintage pieces.
Preparations for the Meaning of Life exhibition at the Macleay Museum continue apace. This last week saw a troop of organisers traipsing through teaching labs on the lookout for vintage pieces. They were particularly interested in the ageing microscopes, lamps and dissecting trays needed to create that ‘biology lab of the 60’s’ look. Several items were spotted, photographed and their location recorded. Somewhat distressingly some items were deemed to be ‘too old’ by curator Dr Jude Philps!

If you have vintage pieces of equipment that you could bear to be separated from for 6 months – please contact Cecily Oakley or Jude Philps.
MEDIA
Cane toads, varroa mites, Murray River turtles and more!
The Australian | Steve Simpson
Vintage science on a beer budget

SMH | Chris Gillies Obituary
Colourful cytogeneticist helped transform science for students

4BC | Rick Shine
Cane Toads

AM ABC Radio | Rick Shine
Cane toad vs cane toad

3AW | Rick Shine
AM Radio 13/6/12

2UE | Rick Shine
AM Radio 13/6/12

ABC Darwin | Rick Shine
FM Radio 13/6/12 – Late breakfast interview

ABC Rural | Rick Shine
Eradicating cane toads through cannibalism

5AA | Rick Shine
AM Radio 13/6/12

ABC1 TV | Rick Shine
Poison pill the latest weapon against toads

2NM | Rick Shine
AM Radio 13/6/12

3WM | Rick Shine
AM Radio 13/6/12

ABC News 24 | Rick Shine
TV 13/6/12

4BC | Rick Shine
AM Radio 13/6/12

2MCE | Rick Shine
FM Radio 13/6/12

SBS TV | Rick Shine
Scientists find chink in cane toad armour
 
Today Show | Rick Shine
Channel 9 TV

River FM | Rick Shine
FM Radio 14/6/12

Radio 4KZ | Rick Shine
AM Radio 14/6/12

4CA AM | Rick Shine
AM Radio 14/6/12

6PR | Rick Shine
AM Radio 14/6/12

2UE | Rick Shine
Afternoons 14/6/12

SBS Radio | Rick Shine
Turning cane toad poison against them

The Australian | Rick Shine
Cash the question in getting cane toads to eat their own

AAP - various | Rick Shine
Scientists find chink in cane toad armour

Daily Liberal | Rick Shine
Cane toads turn out to be their own worst enemy

Daily Telegraph | Rick Shine
Dead cane toads will help make the live ones croak

Herald Sun | Rick Shine
Toxin cure for cane toads

Illawarra Mercury | Rick Shine
The cane toad meets its ultimate predator – itself

Kalgoorlie Miner | Rick Shine
Toad poison

Newcastle Herald | Rick Shine
Tadpole trap for toxic toad

2GB | Rick Shine
Sydney Live 15/6/12

Science | Rick Shine
The Reluctant Toad Killer

Sunraysia Daily | Mike Thompson
Turtle team needs help: experts aim to save species

2UE | Rick Shine
Afternoon Radio 17/6/12

Country News | Rick Shine
Toad is its own worst enemy

ABC Central Victoria | Mike Thompson
Morning Radio 18/6/12

Murray Pioneer | Mike Thompson
Turtle experts take road trip to the Riverland

Byron Shire Echo | Rick Shine
A poisonous new weapon in the struggle with cane toads

The West Australian | Steve Simpson
Protein stops overeating

Bellingen Courier Sun | Rick Shine
Using the cane toad’s poison against itself

Cairns Sun | Rick Shine
Weapon to fight toads

Katherine Times | Rick Shine
Toads their own worst enemy

Western Cape Bulletin | Rick Shine
Using cane toad’s poison against itself

Swan Hill Guardian | Mike Thompson
Uncertain future: Murray River turtles face extinction, say scientists

Riverine Herald | Mike Thompson
Time to act to save turtle species, urge scientists

The Week | Rick Shine
Toad poison a real killer

4BC | Rick Shine
Celebration for a toad

Radio Adelaide | Rick Shine
Cane toad eradication breakthrough

ABC News 24 | Rick Shine
The Quarters

ABC Rural | Ben Oldroyd
Insect expert calls for introduction of varroa-resistant bees

Daily Telegraph | Ben Oldroyd
Bringing bees to their knees

4BC | Ben Oldroyd
Drive

ABC Radio – various | Ben Oldroyd
Recorded interview by Sarina Locke

Radio National | Ben Oldroyd
Bush Telegraph

Countryman | Ben Oldroyd
Bee study packs a mighty punch

Fraser Coast Chronicle and News Mail | Ben Oldroyd
Fears held for Australia’s honey bee industry

Stock Journal | Ben Oldroyd
Australia still unprepared for Varroa mite

Naracoorte Herald | Ben Oldroyd
No more honeybees?

105.7 ABC Darwin | Rick Shine
Guestroom – Professor Rick Shine

ABC Rural | Ben Oldroyd
Scientist confirms the varroa mite could destroy the industry

Rural Report | Ben Oldroyd
ABC Radio 29/6/12

SA Country Hour | Ben Oldroyd
ABC Radio 2/7/12

Wentworth Courier | Mathew Crowther
A 21st century fox picture
EVENTS
Wednesday 8 August, 5:45pm-8pm
Murray Lecture
Sunday 19 August, 3pm-5pm
Warrah Open Day
Saturday 25 August, 9:30am-4pm
Sydney University Open Day
Sunday 2 September
SIMS Harbour Hike
Friday 19 October, 4pm-8pm
Celebrate Biology: your natural selection
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