Beyond 1914 - The University of Sydney and the Great War
August- September 2018
News
The St Vincent Welch brothers: soldiers & doctors
A recent article in the university's Inspired magazine, showcased an assemblage of Egyptian artefacts collected during John Basil St Vincent Welch's [MB,ChM 1906] military service in WWI. 

He was one of four brothers who attended the university, all became doctors and three of whom fought in the Great War.  Herbert Locksley St Vincent Welch [MB, ChM 1914] and Leslie St Vincent Welch, who studied one year of medicine in 1901 then trained in London and qualified as a licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians, also served in the AIF.

The fourth brother Kenyon St Vincent Welch [MB,ChM 1908] was unable to serve in the war, but is known as the first doctor to serve with the Royal Flying Doctor Service in 1928.

Read the complete story by Louise Schwartzkoff House of Treasures 

Portraits courtesy of NSW State Archives, SR9873
Dr Dalyell's War: the process drama
Dr Elsie Dalyell's war story is at the centre of a creativity in education workshop being presented at the British Educational Research Association (BERA) conference in Newcastle upon Tyne later this month. 

A collaboration with university colleagues from the Faculty of Education and Social Work, Dr Alison O'Grady and Catherine Smyth, has produced a process drama from Elsie's archives on the Beyond 1914 website.

Elsie is seen in this photgraph wearing her broad-brimmed sunhat, pictured with the hospital staff in Skopje, 1915.This image from the collection of the Imperial War Museum London, is used as a prompt in the workshop to elicit an empathetic understanding of Elsie's life as a woman and bacteriologist in war-torn Serbia.
Dr Elsie Dalyell's war story is at the centre of a creativity in education workshop being presented at the British Educational Research Association (BERA) conference in Newcastle upon Tyne later this month. 

A collaboration with colleagues from the Faculty of Education and Social Work, Dr Alison O'Grady and Catherine Smyth, has produced a process drama from Elsie's archives on the Beyond 1914 website.

Elsie is seen in this photgraph wearing her broad-brimmed sunhat, pictured with the hospital staff in Skopje, 1915.This image from the collection of the Imperial War Museum London, is used as a prompt in the workshop to create an empathic understanding of Elsie's life as a woman and bacteriologist in war-torn Serbia.

Taking inspiration from her war record, participants will be taken through a number of dramatic interactions during which they will be introduced to historical ideas such as commemoration, the stories we tell about war, women in war, new perspectives on war, as well as the importance to historians of primary evidence as an interpretative tool.

This will be followed by a Q&A panel discussing how process drama as a creative pedagogy can assist students with historical concepts and methodologies, especially the importance of critical thinking, the historical imagination and the role of empathy to broaden historical awareness.

This workshop has also recently been accepted as a presentation at the Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) conference in December 2018 at the University of Sydney.
IMAGE: Imperial War Museums (Documents.6977/A) 
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International Society of First World War Studies
The Beyond 1914 project was recently selected to present a paper at the International Society of First World War Studies conference, at Deakin University in Melbourne. This offered the opportunity for a timely reflection on the extraordinary success of this digital archive. 

We have added tens of thousands of events to personal timelines, identified over half of the 500 names listed at the back of the Book of Remembrance and located additional names, both men and women who were not listed in the original book of 1939.

The development of a digital archive from the significant paper-based university archive, has enriched the original collection of material, increased audience reach, added to our knowledge of the lives of individuals and the connections between professional cohorts during World War I.

As research and public collaboration continues, the personal histories being uncovered are presenting alternative narratives to that of a singular Australian Gallipoli story. 
Expert Nation: Universities, War and 1920s and 1930s Australia
Expert Nation is an ARC-funded project researching and documenting the role of Australian universities in the expansion and professionalistion of expertise between the wars. 

Utlising the same database as Beyond 1914, listings of men and women who served in the First World War from the Universities of Adelaide, Melbourne, Queensland, Tasmania and Western Australia, have now been recorded.

There are now close to 6000 names in the database. The priority for this project is researching survivors who returned to Australia; recording their occupations and professional associations during the 1920s and 1930s.

War presented opportunities to develop new medical sciences like physiotherapy and psychiatry, the creation of new medical procedures for the treatment of battlefield injuries not seen before and the science and engineering feats required to out-manoeuvre the enemy at the front. In a conflict that was fought as much by experts as by expeditionary forces, Australian university graduates played an important part. 

A collected volume on the influences of war and the professionalisation of  particular occupations is due for publication early next year through Melbourne University Press. Contributors include Professor Kate Darian Smith, Professor Stephen Garton, Associate Professor Julai Horne, Dr Tamson Pietsch and Dr James Waghorne.
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