SYDNEY SCHOOL OF EDUCATION & SOCIAL WORK
16 August 2018
STAFF BULLETIN
   
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STAFF NEWS
Appointment of Head of School SSESW
Dear colleagues,

I am pleased to inform you Professor Debra Hayes has been appointed Head of School, Sydney School of Education and Social Work. She will commence this role on 29th January, 2019, following her return from SSP.

Deb is currently the president-elect of the Australian Association for Research in Education, and will be its president 2019-20. She has recently taken up a Hallsworth Visiting Fellowship at the University of Manchester.

Dear colleagues,

I am pleased to inform you Professor Debra Hayes has been appointed Head of School, Sydney School of Education and Social Work. She will commence this role on 29th January, 2019, following her return from SSP.

Deb is currently the president-elect of the Australian Association for Research in Education, and will be its president 2019-20. She has recently taken up a Hallsworth Visiting Fellowship at the University of Manchester.

An internationally recognised researcher in the fields of education and equity, Deb locates her research in contexts where there are high levels of poverty and difference in both mainstream and alternative educational settings.

A former secondary school science teacher and alumna (BSc 1982), she has held posts at the University of Technology, Sydney and Griffith University before returning to the University of Sydney in 2007 where she has been the director of the core program of study for all students enrolled in initial teacher education since 2009.

Deb is one of the champions of the newly funded FASS Strategic Research Theme on community-led research.

I am sure you will all join with me in offering Deb your congratulations and support.

Fran
Professor Fran Waugh | Head of School
Sydney School of Education and Social Work, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Reminder | Annual Scholarships and Prizes Awards Ceremony
The Head of School of the Sydney School of Education and Social Work, Professor Fran Waugh, cordially invites you and your guest, to attend our celebration of the School’s Annual Awards Ceremony for the recipients of Scholarships, Prizes and Awards.

Date:   Thursday, 30 August, 2018
Time:   5.30 pm - 7.00 pm
Venue: MacLaurin Hall, The Quadrangle, The University of Sydney,
Camperdown Campus.

The Head of School of the Sydney School of Education and Social Work, Professor Fran Waugh, cordially invites you and your guest, to attend our celebration of the School’s Annual Awards Ceremony for the recipients of Scholarships, Prizes and Awards.

Date:   Thursday, 30 August, 2018
Time:   5.30 pm - 7.00 pm
Venue: MacLaurin Hall, The Quadrangle, The University of Sydney,
Camperdown Campus.

The Certificates will be presented by The Pro Chancellor, Professor Marian Baird AO. Dr Alison O'Grady will be MC for the night.

The Ceremony will be held on Thursday the 30th of August, 2018 in MacLaurin Hall, The Quadrangle, The University of Sydney, 5.15 pm for a 5.30 pm start to conclude at 7.00pm.

At the conclusion of the formal proceedings, we invite you to stay for canapés and refreshments.
 
Best Regards

Nathan Allan | Teaching, Curriculum and Timetabling Coordinator
Sydney School of Education and Social Work
Expressions of Interest - Associate Dean (Student Affairs)
This is a call for expressions of interest for the role of Associate Dean (Student Affairs), which falls vacant for a period of 14 months from 1 November 2018.
 
Click on detailed position description . If you have any queries, please contact arts.dean@sydney.edu.au.
 
This is a call for expressions of interest for the role of Associate Dean (Student Affairs), which falls vacant for a period of 14 months from 1 November 2018.
 
Click on detailed position description . If you have any queries, please contact arts.dean@sydney.edu.au.
 
Please submit an expression of interest of no more than two pages indicating relevant experience together with a CV to arts.dean@sydney.edu.au by Monday, 27 August 2018.


Annamarie.
PROFESSOR ANNAMARIE JAGOSE   | FAHA 
Dean
Launch OCHRE
 Wednesday 15 August saw the launch of a new approach to undertaking research with Aboriginal communities through the OCHRE Plan Evaluation, across multiple Aboriginal communities in NSW.

Wednesday 15 August saw the launch of a new approach to undertaking research with Aboriginal communities through the OCHRE Plan Evaluation, across multiple Aboriginal communities in NSW.

This research was seen as revolutionary by the state government as it was Community-Led and provides first-hand experiences and evidence led by Aboriginal communities on working with government agencies to achieve new approaches to resolve long-held concerns for Aboriginal communities in NSW.

Dr Lynette Riley, who sits on the OCHRE Evaluation Steering Committee, was invited by the Wiradjuri delegation to be a part of their delegation in the hand-over of their North-West Wiradjuri Aboriginal Language and Culture Nest Report, led and prepared by Professor Ilan Katz, with the Social Policy Research Centre, UNSW.
 
For more information click on OCHRE Plan and Research.
Institute of Open Adoption Studies
Associate Professor Amy Conley Wright and Dr Susan Collings of the Institute of Open Adoption Studies were invited to write a short article for the Australian Institute of Family Studies’ practice-focused CFCA newsletter.  Click on Article.

Associate Professor Amy Conley Wright and Dr Susan Collings of the Institute of Open Adoption Studies were invited to write a short article for the Australian Institute of Family Studies’ practice-focused CFCA newsletter.

The article describes practices to support children in permanent care and their families to make contact work and was circulated today to 13,000+ subscribers. Click on Article.

Ethics Committee Membership
Serving as a member of an ethics committee provides a unique service role opportunity, allowing you to partner with other academics in an intellectually stimulating and collegial environment.

Serving as a member of an ethics committee provides a unique service role opportunity, allowing you to partner with other academics in an intellectually stimulating and collegial environment.

The role of the ethics committees is to facilitate and promote ethical research through an efficient and effective review process, in accordance with the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007) (‘National Statement’). The committees review proposals for research to be undertaken by staff and students of the University, to determine whether they are ethically acceptable and in accordance with relevant standards and guidelines.

Humanities Review Committee

The Humanities Review Committee is one of five discipline-specific low-risk ethics committees at the University. In accordance with the National Statement, ‘low risk research’ is defined as research in which the only foreseeable risk to participants is of discomfort (Chapter 2.1).

The Humanities Review Committee is made up of academics from various disciplines within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

The University also has three Human Research Ethics Committee (HRECs), three Modification Review Committees (MRCs), and four other discipline-specific low-risk review committees. 

Time commitment

The Committee meets once every 4 weeks (12 meetings per year). Meetings typically run for around 1 hour, but may take up to 2 hours.

Each committee member is assigned to review approximately 1-3 applications as primary reviewer, and to provide additional comments as secondary reviewer on a further 1-3 applications (though the number of reviews vary according to the agenda length).

All ethics applications are submitted and reviewed via an online system called IRMA. The Ethics Office provides training in the use of IRMA.

The agenda for each meeting is compiled by the Ethics Office and distributed to committee members 8 working days prior to the meeting date. Committee members must review their assigned items and enter their comments in IRMA before the day of the meeting.

New members

Academics interested in joining the committee are invited to attend and observe a meeting, and meet the Chair, before deciding whether to join. New members receive training from the Ethics Office, and are also assigned a mentor (an existing experienced committee member) to provide advice and assistance in reviewing applications.  

New members are assigned to provide only secondary reviews for approx. 3 months before taking on primary reviews.

Questions

Please contact Jen Scott Curwood (chair) at js.curwood@sydney.edu.au with any questions or Emily Knowles (committee secretariat) in the Ethics Office should you be interested or have any questions about serving on the Humanities Review Committee: human.ethics@sydney.edu.au
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SAFETY HEALTH AND WELLBEING
Steptember
Promoting Steptember is underway. Only 3 Uni teams registered so far, Uni of Sydney had 64 teams in 2017.  A good way to get people moving at no cost to the Uni or the individual and hopefully a fundraising boost for Cerebral Palsy.
Promoting Steptember is underway. Only 3 Uni teams registered so far, Uni of Sydney had 64 teams in 2017.  A good way to get people moving at no cost to the Uni or the individual and hopefully a fundraising boost for Cerebral Palsy.  
  
“Join the September Challenge FREE and support kids with Cerebral Palsy. The challenge is to take 10,000 steps a day for 28 days straight. Just head to the Steptember website here.
 
The average office worker takes only 3,000 steps a day, so Steptember is a great way to boost your own fitness and do something great for kids with cerebral palsy at the same time. 

Just organise a team of four colleagues, and nominate one person as your team captain. The captain signs themselves up (using the code: UNISYD2018 so that all team member’s registration costs are covered) and invites three team members to join. Each team member will receive an email invitation which they click on to complete their registration.
 
NOTE: All staff ideally need to register by August 18th to receive their Steptember Kit & Pedometer on time!
 
Ask your Team Captain to sign up for Steptember now.
 
For more information go to http://sydney.edu.au/whs/wellbeing/steptember.shtml or contact Fiona Wolfenden, Wellbeing Coordinator. ……. and if that doesn't convince you this heart-warming video might.
https://abcnews.go.com/US/video/im-walking-year-cerebral-palsy-takes-steps-56355188

Fiona Wolfenden | Wellbeing Coordinator
Riskware
Managers - Responding to incidents, injuries and hazards
Responsiveness A RiskWare Action Plan must be submitted within 7 calendar days of the incident/hazard being reported.

Managers - Responding to incidents, injuries and hazards
Responsiveness A RiskWare Action Plan must be submitted within 7 calendar days of the incident/hazard being reported.

Instructions
It may take longer than 7 days to complete the required corrective action and close the incident, but the plan including a description of the actions and anticipated timeframes for completion must be completed within 7 calendar days.

Incident/hazard notification When your staff report an incident, injury or hazard in RiskWare you will automatically receive an email notification. This email provides summary details of the incident or hazard, instructions on what you need to do next and a direct link to the record in RiskWare. Click on the link in the email to view the details of the incident or hazard. From here you can complete a corrective action plan.

Alternatively, you can log on to RiskWare at any time, click on the “Incident Register” icon and then look in the Assigned Incident/Hazard tab. From here you can choose to either View Details or enter a Corrective Action Plan.

Corrective action plans Corrective action plans are used to record the actions that have or will be taken in response to an incident or a reported hazard.

Watch these short training videos or follow the instructions provided below each video for guidance on how to:
  • Complete a corrective action plan
  • Respond to an incident that is outside of your control, and that of the University.
  • Reassign an incident or hazard to another University supervisor.
For further information click on Read more...
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UPCOMING EVENTS
Critical Theory, Education & Social Work reading group #15 – “Nations and Diasporas”
Time:  12.30-1.30pm
Venue: Rm 435, Education Building, University of Sydney

For our next gathering, we will be discussing a chapter from Stuart Hall's posthumously published The Fateful Triangle: Race, Ethnicity, Nation (2017), which is based on his 1994 Du Bois Lectures at Harvard University. We will be focusing particularly on Chapter 3 - "Nations and Diasporas". (Don't let the page count scare you; the pages are tiny and the font is pretty big).

Time:  12.30-1.30pm
Venue: Rm 435, Education Building, University of Sydney

For our next gathering, we will be discussing a chapter from Stuart Hall's posthumously published The Fateful Triangle: Race, Ethnicity, Nation (2017), which is based on his 1994 Du Bois Lectures at Harvard University. We will be focusing particularly on Chapter 3 - "Nations and Diasporas". (Don't let the page count scare you; the pages are tiny and the font is pretty big).

We look forward to meeting with you, whether again or for the first time.
For those with institutional access, the book is available for download through your library. If you would like a copy of the chapter sent to you, please email Remy: remy.low@sydney.edu.au

For more info, please check out the reading group’s Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/edswcrits/)
2018 Institute of Open Adoption Studies Research Forum
The 2018 Institute of Open Adoption Studies, annual Research to Practice Forum Taking the Long View,  with a focus on longitudinal research.

The 2018 Institute of Open Adoption Studies, annual Research to Practice Forum Taking the Long View,  with a focus on longitudinal research.

Our international keynote speaker is Professor Harriet Ward, from Loughborough University. Professor Ward, will be speaking about the research she has been leading with Barnardos Australia, investigating the outcomes achieved for the 210 NSW children adopted through Barnardos between 1 September 1987 and 30 June 2013.

Other keynote speakers include Professor Elizabeth Fernandez, from the University of NSW, Professor Paul Delfabbro, from Adelaide University, and Associate Professor Stefanie Schurer, from the University of Sydney.

In the afternoon a series of concurrent Master Classes offer a diverse range of topics, from research into the outcomes for children restored to birth families, Aboriginal Kinship structures, Pathways of Care Longitudinal Study and the use arts-based methods for conducting qualitative research with birth parents.

If you are interested in attending, you can email us at esw.ioas@sydney.edu.au

For more information
http://sydney.edu.au/education_social_work/research/centres_and_networks/IOAS/events.shtml
13th University of Sydney TESOL Research Network Colloquium
In conjunction with the Centre for English Teaching (CET), University of Sydney and the Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University

Saturday 8 September, 2018
Venue: University of Sydney Law School
 A Free Colloquium
Attached: TESOL Research Colloquium 2018 Program

In conjunction with the Centre for English Teaching (CET), University of Sydney and the Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University
Saturday 8 September, 2018
Venue: University of Sydney Law School
 A Free Colloquium
Attached: TESOL Research Colloquium 2018 Program

We are pleased to invite you to attend The 13th University of Sydney TESOL Research Network Colloquium 2018, which aims to provide a forum to discuss and share research in the area of TESOL as well as explore possible future research collaborations in the area. The Colloquium is a place for networking, for both established and new TESOL researchers. The Colloquium includes presentation sessions on a wide range of TESOL and TESOL-related research, both in progress and completed. It also includes a networking session for people working in the area of TESOL research. The aim of this is to provide the opportunity for TESOL researchers to talk to each other about their research and to explore possible future research collaborations.



Keynote Speakers:
  • Ann Johns, San Diego State University, USA, “Preparing Students for Writing in the Disciplines
  • Honglin Chen, University of Wollongong, Australia, “Investigating the Teaching of Persuasive Writing in Culturally Diverse Contexts
Free Pre-Colloquium Workshops on Friday 7 September, 2018:
  • Workshop (9.00am - 12.00 pm): Ann Johns, San Diego State University, USA, “Connecting Reading and Writing in an EAP Class
  • Workshop (1.00pm - 4.00 pm): Jack Richards, The University of Sydney, Australia, “Curriculum Design for Novices
Registration for the Workshops (register by Friday 31 August, 2018): Registration for the Colloquium (register by Monday 3 September, 2018): Inquiries Contact Aek Phakiti (aek.phakiti@sydney.edu.au) for inquiries about the Colloquium and Workshops.
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CRLI | Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation
CRLI Seminar
CRLI Seminar
 Conceptualising educational design for professional identity development, a CRLI Seminar with Maryam Khosronejad -
Click on Website. 
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RESEARCH
A long journey: the experience of writing a thesis
A long journey: the experience of writing a thesis During the month of August, the Office of Doctoral Studies will present a seminar series centred around the theme of "A long journey: the experience of writing a thesis". The presenters will be our own recent graduates from higher research degrees, Sydney School of Education and Social Work.
 

A long journey: the experience of writing a thesis During the month of August, the Office of Doctoral Studies will present a seminar series centred around the theme of "A long journey: the experience of writing a thesis". The presenters will be our own recent graduates from higher research degrees, Sydney School of Education and Social Work.
 
To finish this series off, our final seminar on 29 August, will be a workshop facilitated by renowned Professor Brian Paltridge.

 
22 August
Different types of theses; developing the text and the story
Time: 4-5.30pm

Venue: Room 458, Education Building A35

RSVP: No need to RSVP, just turn up on the day
 
Speakers:

Nikki Brunker is a lecturer at The University of Sydney’s School of Education and Social Work. After completing a BEd at USyd Nikki taught in alternative and mainstream schools, with experience in early childhood, primary and secondary schooling as a teacher and Principal. Nikki’s research interests include children’s social and emotional wellbeing, Initial Teacher Education pedagogy, alternative schooling and innovative qualitative methodologies. Current research projects include an exploration of children’s experiences when school has not ‘fit’; pre-service teacher and teacher educator perceptions of ITE pedagogy; and the experience of moving from Home Education to being a Teacher. Nikki is interested in Post-Qualitative and Arts Informed Inquiry approaches to research. Her PhD thesis involved an interpretation of Lawrence Lightfoot’s Portraiture overlaid with patchwork, which won the NSW Institute for Educational Research’s Beth Southwell Award for Outstanding Thesis.

Thea Werkhoven is a recent graduate from the PhD program in the Sydney School of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney. Thea completed her research project on obesity knowledge and attitudes in the education sector and developed an intervention to improve obesity related knowledge and attitudes amongst pre-service health professionals. In order to maximise research output, Thea decided to complete her thesis by publication and at the conclusion of her study had 4 chapters of the thesis published as peer reviewed articles including one to an open access journal. Qualified as a dietitian, Thea’s passions are food and teaching nutrition and she uses this to her advantage, teaching a large scale undergraduate health and nutrition elective within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Sydney.
HDR Student of the Month | Jia ying Neoh
Our student of the month is Jia Ying Neoh
Degree: PhD 
Supervisors: Professor Murray Print and Dr Yeow-Tong Chia

Thesis title: The practice of civics and citizenship education in New South Wales primary schools.
Our student of the month is Jia Ying Neoh
Degree: PhD 
Supervisors: Professor Murray Print and Dr Yeow-Tong Chia

Thesis title: The practice of civics and citizenship education in New South Wales primary schools.
 
Email:    jneo7228@uni.sydney.edu.au
 
Project description:
Directed by the goal of developing ‘active and informed’ citizens in the Melbourne Declaration, Civics and Citizenship Education (CCE) received renewed interest in the Australian Curriculum. Although CCE is an identified component in the Australian Curriculum, it is not one in the New South Wales primary curriculum. Set within the complexities of multiple curricular changes and a somewhat abstract direction for CCE in the NSW primary curriculum, Jia Ying’s research aims to provide an up-to-date understanding of how New South Wales primary schools are addressing CCE.
 
Based on four case studies involving primary schools in different school sectors and with different student profiles, the study is interested in the ‘what’ and the ‘how’ of CCE. It examines how CCE is interpreted by New South Wales primary schools and how it is organised within the schools’ curricula. Besides civics and citizenship education, Jia Ying’s research interests include curriculum and instruction, globalisation and education, international and comparative education, sociology of education and humanities education.
 
Jia Ying Neoh is a primary school teacher and has had experience in primary school teaching in New South Wales and Singapore. Trained in curriculum studies and educational leadership, she spearheaded the implementation of the Social Studies curriculum in support of Citizenship Education in a Singaporean primary school prior to commencing her doctoral research.  She currently works casually as a primary school teacher, tertiary supervisor to pre-service teachers and tutor.   

Publications:
Chia, Y. T., & Neoh, J. Y.  (2017)  Comparative Insights on Civics and Citizenship Education and the Curriculum: A view from Singapore. In A. Peterson & L. Tudball (Eds.), Civics and Citizenship Education in Australia. United Kingdom Bloomsbury Academic.
 Neoh, J. Y.  (2017)  Neoliberal Education? Comparing Character and Citizenship Education in Singapore and Civics and Citizenship education in Australian Journal of Social Science Education, 16(3), 29- 39.

Conference presentations:   
Neoh J.Y.  (2016)  ‘Neoliberal education? Comparing character and citizenship education in Singapore and civics and citizenship education in Australia.  Paper presented at the 12th CitiZed Conference, Burmingham, United Kingdom.  28-30 July 2016.



Neoh J.Y.  (2016)  ‘Comparing character and citizenship education in Singapore and civics and citizenship education in Australia’.  Paper presented at the OCIES conference.  Sydney, Australia.  24-26 November 2016.

Neoh, J.Y.  (2015)  ‘Same acronym, different contexts: Character and citizenship education in Singapore and civics and citizenship education in Australia’.  Paper presented at the Asia-Pacific Network for Moral Education Conference, Sydney, Australia.  4-7 December 2015.
Mentoring Early and New Talent for Opportunities in Research
Applications for the inaugural MENTOR (Mentoring Early and New Talent for Opportunities in Research) workshop are now open. 
 

Applications for the inaugural MENTOR (Mentoring Early and New Talent for Opportunities in Research) workshop are now open. 
 
MENTOR is a workshop designed for women and gender diverse ECRs in the Humanities and Social Sciences at The University of Sydney. During the three-day intensive workshop participants will receive targeted career support and concrete advice on how best to forge a career in academia.

Participants will:
  • Attend talks, panels, and group networking events;
  • Participate in practical skills-based sessions such as mock interviews, how to respond to selection criteria, and how to craft your CV;
  • Hear from leading scholars in their discipline on how to navigate the international job market, and how to apply for grants and fellowships (including Discovery Early Career Researcher Awards)
The workshop will be held from December 5 - 7 at The University of Sydney. The deadline for applications is Friday 20th July. 
 
Please see the attached flyer for more details, including contact information. Eligible candidates are encouraged to apply by completing the application form found online: 

http://sydney.edu.au/arts/research/inventing-the-international/mentor/index.shtml
 
For more information please email: mentor2018.conference@sydney.edu.au
New Publication | Professor Brian Paltridge
Paltridge, B. (2018). Writing for publication. In L. Woodrow. Introducing course design in English for specific purposes (pp. 228-233). London: Routledge.
Reporting your publications
A reminder to academic and honorary staff and HDR students that details of your new publications should be sent to Camilla Pilgrim for entry into the University’s IRMA database.

A reminder to academic and honorary staff and HDR students that details of your new publications should be sent to Camilla Pilgrim for entry into the University’s IRMA database.
 
Academic staff and HDR students, once your publications are in IRMA they will automatically display on your profile. Please check your profiles to see if any publications are missing.

Honorary staff, publications will be added to IRMA and to your honorary profile.
 
The University’s central Research Support are currently verifying and assessing 2017 research publications. ERA eligible publications are:
 
Traditional research output types:
 
● books - authored research
● chapters in research books - authored research
● journal articles - scholarly, peer reviewed
● conference publications - full paper refereed, published in full

Non-traditional research outputs:
  • ● creative works – must have a research statement, detailing the research contribution and significance etc.
  • ● commissioned/solicited research reports for external bodies - published/publicly available
 Please provide a DOI or link to the journal article online and a link to online conference proceedings where available.

All ERA eligible publications go through a verification and assessment process by the University to ensure they meet the ERA definition of research. Publications which are not eligible – e.g. edited books, articles in professional magazines, edited journals etc. – can also be added to IRMA so they display on your profile.
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JOBS, NOTICES & MISCELLANEOUS
‘History of University Life Seminar’ - last term program 2018
Advance HUL Notice for Diaries:
Welcome to our final HUL seminars for 2018

 Our papers will focus on the theme of  ‘Campus Culture…and the Institutional History of the University of Sydney’

Advance HUL Notice for Diaries:
Welcome to our final HUL seminars for 2018

Our papers will focus on the theme of  ‘Campus Culture…and the Institutional History of the University of Sydney’

29   August:   Dr Laura Ginters (Senior Lecturer, Department of Theatre and Performance Studies, University of Sydney)

 ‘Agamemnon’ comes to the Antipodes:  early drama at The University of Sydney
 
26 September:   Professor R Ian Jack  (Senior Fellow and Archivist, St Andrews College)

  ‘The peculiar culture of a College History’ (with special reference to the existing studies of the Sydney University Colleges)
 
31 October : Dr Tim Robinson, The University Archivist
   ‘University Archives and the collective memory of an institution’
 
Arrangements are as usual:   we meet on a Wednesday, 12-1.30 in the SCR of St Pauls’ College - where a light lunch is offered (courtesy of the Warden) between the paper and seminar discussion
 
A seminar notice (with cv of speaker and abstract of the paper) will be circulated in the week before the meeting (when replies will be invited towards catering purposes).
 
Hope you will be able to join us for this exciting theme in higher education studies
 
Deryck Schreuder and Julia Horne
HUL Convenors 2018
Agamemnon Comes to the Antipodes
Our fourth seminar in the History of University Life Sydney Research Seminar in Higher Education for 2018 will be Dr Laura Ginters, Agamemnon comes to the Antipodes, to be held Wednesday 29 August 2018, St Paul’s College Senior Common Room, noon to 1.30pm. Please join us for what is sure to be an interesting paper with plenty of time for discussion over a light lunch. Please RSVP to Deryck Schreuder or Julia Horne by Friday 24 August so we can confirm catering arrangements—seating is limited.
 
Our fourth seminar in the History of University Life Sydney Research Seminar in Higher Education for 2018 will be Dr Laura Ginters, Agamemnon comes to the Antipodes, to be held Wednesday 29 August 2018, St Paul’s College Senior Common Room, noon to 1.30pm. Please join us for what is sure to be an interesting paper with plenty of time for discussion over a light lunch. Please RSVP to Deryck Schreuder or Julia Horne by Friday 24 August so we can confirm catering arrangements—seating is limited.
 
We would like to thank St Paul’s College for its continued support for this seminar on historical and contemporary questions in higher education including a light lunch.
 
Deryck Schreuder and Julia Horne
(HUL 2018 Organizers)

Abstract of the topic and speaker is below.
Agamemnon comes to the Antipodesearly drama at the University of Sydney
 
In 1886 students and staff from the Classics department of the University of Sydney staged – to considerable acclaim – a production of Agamemnon in the Great Hall. This marked the real beginning of dramatic activities at the University of Sydney and was, moreover, the first time a Greek play had been performed in the colony. Just three years later, the Sydney University Dramatic Society (SUDS) was founded: in this, it mirrored events which took place a few years earlier at Oxford University where a production of Agamemnon in 1880 preceded the establishment of Oxford University Dramatic Society (OUDS) in 1885. That this was more than just coincidence is demonstrated by photos I have found from each production which have remarkable similarities – from the “backdrop” to costuming choices and arrangement of the clearly identifiable characters. The two universities were, quite literally, a world apart, in an era where travelling between the England the Colony of New South Wales meant a four month boat trip – how and why was this play reproduced with such uncanny similarities?
 
In my presentation I will uncover the “missing link” between the two productions, connecting the formation of two of the world’s oldest, most illustrious, and ongoing university dramatic societies, through Aeschylus’ play. This Antipodean Agamemnon marks an important moment not only in relation to the birth of Australia’s oldest theatre company – SUDS – but also the reception of Classical literature in Australia, with the Oxford and Sydney productions offering a fascinating case study which also touches on the complex relationship between imperialism, empire and classical reception.

Dr Laura Ginters is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Theatre and Performance Studies at the University of Sydney. Her current research focusses on historical rehearsal practices, and Australian theatre history, especially amateur theatre: her book on student drama at the University of Sydney (The Ripples Before the (New) Wave, with Robyn Dalton) will be published in 2018 by Currency Press.

 HISTORY OF UNIVERSITY LIFE
Sydney Research Seminar in Higher Education
Improving STEM Education & Future Skills
Click on Website.
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