SYDNEY SCHOOL OF EDUCATION & SOCIAL WORK
17 May 2018
STAFF BULLETIN
   
Share
Back to top ^
STAFF NEWS
Writer in Residence Sydney Ideas
This year, on World Poetry Day on 21 March, the University of Sydney named Australian poet, author and teacher Mark Tredinnick as its School of Education and Social Work / Copyright Agency Writer-in-Residence 2018.   Click on Photos.


This year, on World Poetry Day on 21 March, the University of Sydney named Australian poet, author and teacher Mark Tredinnick as its School of Education and Social Work / Copyright Agency Writer-in-Residence 2018.   Click on Photos.

The programme was launched on Tuesday 15 May with a Sydney Ideas event, The Landscape of Poetry, a conversation with Mark Tredinnick and Professor Robyn Ewing AM. Associate Professor Fran Waugh welcomed over 150 guests to the discussion on the landscape of contemporary poetry and the importance of embedding creativity in education at all points of life and learning.

Mark Tredinnick is "one of our great poets of place, not just of geographic place, but of the spiritual and moral landscapes", as articulated by Judith Beveridge (poet and Creative Writing lecturer, Department of English, University of Sydney).
Reminder | International Strategy Survey
Do you know people in/from other countries?  Do you work with them, or want to work with them on teaching, research, and/or consulting?  

If so, please remember to complete the survey distributed by FASS by clicking on Start Survey.


Do you know people in/from other countries?  Do you work with them, or want to work with them on teaching, research, and/or consulting?  

If so, please remember to complete the survey distributed by FASS by clicking on Start Survey.

Results from this survey will be used to inform the FASS International Strategy, and it is important that SSESW has strong representation. Let’s aim for a 100% response rate, mates!

Dr MATTHEW A.M. THOMAS | Lecturer in Education
Sydney School of Education and Social Work
Faculty Meeting
The first Faculty Meeting for 2018 will take place on
Date  Friday, 1 June
Time: 
9.30am -11.30 am.
Venue: Education Lecture Theatre 351, Education Building A35.

The first Faculty Meeting for 2018 will take place on
Date  Friday, 1 June
Time: 
9.30am -11.30 am.
Venue: Education Lecture Theatre 351, Education Building A35.

A light lunch will be served afterwards. To confirm your attendance and for catering purposes, please register on this link.

At this Faculty Meeting, we will be focusing on Education themes as we continue to deliver the slate of work associated with the transformed undergraduate curriculum. In particular, we will run some information-rich, practically oriented sessions on how the Faculty will approach the curriculum mapping and assessment exercise and provide an update on the pilot of FASS3999 Interdisciplinary Impact.
 
If there are other matters that you think would be productively included in this Faculty Meeting, please respond to this email to let me know.
 
I will try and make the format as informative and engaging as possible and there will also be opportunity for questions, feedback and general discussion.
 
PROFESSOR ANNAMARIE JAGOSE   | FAHA 
Dean | Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
School Board Meeting and Forum
On Thursday 14 June we will have a School Board meeting, followed by a Forum for Supervisors.  The forum is both for current supervisors of higher research degree students and for those who are interested in being involved in supervision.      

On Thursday 14 June we will have a School Board meeting, followed by a Forum for Supervisors.  The forum is both for current supervisors of higher research degree students and for those who are interested in being involved in supervision.      
  • 12 – 1pm:  School Board meeting
  • 1pm – 2pm:  Forum for supervisors
Forum for supervisors
The forum is both for current supervisors of higher research degree students and for those who are interested in being involved in supervision.
 
There have been significant changes in Research Education the last two years. The forum is an opportunity to find information about key changes and how the university, faculty and school are supporting students’ candidature, from admissions to examinations. We will also discuss how best to support supervisors, both experienced ones and those starting their supervisory role.   If you have any questions about the Forum, please contact Ilektra Spandagou. 
 
A sandwich lunch will be provided at 12 noon.  Please confirm any dietary requirements by including them in your calendar response, or by emailing Linda Simpson.
Back to top ^
SAFETY HEALTH AND WELLBEING
Riskware
Managers - Responding to incidents, injuries and hazards
Responsiveness A RiskWare Action Plan must be submitted within 7 calendar days of the incident/hazard being reported.

Managers - Responding to incidents, injuries and hazards
Responsiveness A RiskWare Action Plan must be submitted within 7 calendar days of the incident/hazard being reported.

Instructions
It may take longer than 7 days to complete the required corrective action and close the incident, but the plan including a description of the actions and anticipated timeframes for completion must be completed within 7 calendar days.

Incident/hazard notification When your staff report an incident, injury or hazard in RiskWare you will automatically receive an email notification. This email provides summary details of the incident or hazard, instructions on what you need to do next and a direct link to the record in RiskWare. Click on the link in the email to view the details of the incident or hazard. From here you can complete a corrective action plan.

Alternatively, you can log on to RiskWare at any time, click on the “Incident Register” icon and then look in the Assigned Incident/Hazard tab. From here you can choose to either View Details or enter a Corrective Action Plan.

Corrective action plans Corrective action plans are used to record the actions that have or will be taken in response to an incident or a reported hazard.

Watch these short training videos or follow the instructions provided below each video for guidance on how to:
  • Complete a corrective action plan
  • Respond to an incident that is outside of your control, and that of the University.
  • Reassign an incident or hazard to another University supervisor.
For further information click on Read more...
Back to top ^
UPCOMING EVENTS
Critical Theory, Ed and SW reading group #12 – “Quantified Selves”
In keeping with the theme of our previous gathering somewhat, we will be chatting about Deborah Lupton's paper "The diverse domains of quantified selves: self-tracking modes and dataveillance" at our end-of-May reading group gathering*
 
Date: Friday 25 May 2018
Time: 12.30-1.30pm
Venue: Education Building (A35), Room 436

In keeping with the theme of our previous gathering somewhat, we will be chatting about Deborah Lupton's paper "The diverse domains of quantified selves: self-tracking modes and dataveillance" at our end-of-May reading group gathering*
 
Date: Friday 25 May 2018
Time: 12.30-1.30pm
Venue: Education Building (A35), Room 436
 
You can find the paper here: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03085147.2016.1143726
 
If you don't have institutional access, please email Remy for a copy: remy.low@sydney.edu.au
 
We look forward to seeing you there if you can make it, whether again or for the first time. All welcome :)
 
* Please note the slight change of time and room for our next gathering.
ASA Workshops | Learning from Country
The Aboriginal Studies Association in partnership with the University of Sydney and the Tribal Warrior Association run a number of teacher professional learning workshops throughout the year.
Attachments: ASA-Save the Dates Update
Applying Learning from Country to Curriculum


The Aboriginal Studies Association in partnership with the University of Sydney and the Tribal Warrior Association run a number of teacher professional learning workshops throughout the year.
Attachments: ASA-Save the Dates Update
Applying Learning from Country to Curriculum

Our courses are based on the ethos of  ‘Learning From Country’, acknowledging and respecting the cultural and educational expertise of our local Aboriginal community and deep respect for the Country we learn on.
 
These workshops are aimed primary and secondary teachers and teacher educators across all curriculum areas to meet the requirements of the Australian Curriculum Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cross Curriculum Priority.
 
All courses are NESA accredited.
Please pass onto your networks.
Enquiries through cathie.burgess@sydney.edu.au
 
Dr Cathie Burgess | Senior Lecturer
Aboriginal Studies Curriculum & Aboriginal Education
Convenor, Indigenous Research Collaboration
Mabo Day Event
Date:    Friday 1 June 2018
Time:   12.00 – 1.00pm followed by lunch
Venue: Webster Lecture Theatre, Veterinary Science Conference Centre, Regimental Drive, The University of Sydney

Please RVSP here by Monday 28 May 2018.

Date:    Friday 1 June 2018
Time:   12.00 – 1.00pm followed by lunch
Venue: Webster Lecture Theatre, Veterinary Science Conference Centre, Regimental Drive, The University of Sydney

Please RVSP here by Monday 28 May 2018.

Mabo Day recognises the anniversary of the decision to grant land rights to Eddie “Koiki” Mabo – a leader within the Torres Strait Islander Community. The Mabo Decision was a turning point in the recognition of land rights for Indigenous Australians, and led to the passing of the Native Title Act in 1993.
 
Please join us to celebrate this important day at an event featuring keynote speaker Brian Bero, Meriam man from the Komet tribe and nephew of Eddie Mabo. Brian will be joined by Dr Leah Lui-Chivizhe, Wingara Mura Fellow, and Mary Waria, Mana Yura Student Support Officer, in a panel discussion facilitated by Dr Nicole Watson, Associate Dean, Indigenous Strategy and Services, The University of Sydney Law School.
 
Please join us for lunch following the proceedings.
Visiting Scholar Seminar | Dr Mikaël De Clercq

Academic adjustment under investigation:From theoretical analysis to the actual experience of academic transition

Date and Time: Monday 18 June, 4-5pm
Venue: Rm 424, Bldg. A35, Manning Rd
Guest Speaker: Dr Mikaël De Clercq

Academic adjustment under investigation:From theoretical analysis to the actual experience of academic transition

Date and Time: Monday 18 June, 4-5pm
Venue: Rm 424, Bldg. A35, Manning Rd
Guest Speaker: Dr Mikaël De Clercq


There is a vast body of knowledge regarding the transition to higher education. Yet, it is still difficult to draw a precise picture of students’ adjustment process to university. This presentation will provide an in-depth investigation by presenting a Belgian research project.
 
Complementary methods (qualitative design, path analysis, multilevel analysis, person centred analysis, experimental design…) were carried out, in order to investigate the importance of:
  •   the temporal nature of the academic year,
  •   students’ entrance patterns, and
  •   context-specific understanding of the first-year experience.
Practical implications of the results and the role of diversity for the transition to higher education will also be discussed.

Dr Mikaël De Clercq (PhD) is a Belgian researcher in educational psychology from the Psychological Research Institute at the Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium.
 
Through his research, Mikaël mainly looks at students’ experience of the transition to the first year at university. Grounded in empirical literature on academic achievement, in motivational theories (self-determination theory, expectancy-value theory) and Nicholson’s model of transition cycles, he investigates a multivariate and dynamic approach to academic adjustment. As a member of the European research group on Students’ Learning in Transition, Mikaël also investigates the complex interplay between students’ learning processing, self-regulation and motivation (for more details: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Mikael_Clercq).
 
Presently (1 May until 30 June), Mikaël is an invited researcher at the University of Sydney, working on the FIT-Choice project (www.fitchoice.org; with Professor Helen Watt), in order to identify distinct typologies of coping among beginning teachers until their mid-career, and consequences for their teaching style and student outcomes.
 
He looks forward to connect with colleagues who share related substantive or methodological interests during his visit.
Email: mikael.declercq@uclouvain.be
Room 537 @ Bldg. A35
Back to top ^
CRLI | Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation
University education and non cognitive skill development
Join us on May 22nd when Associate Professor Stefanie Schurer will discuss the recently published paper, University education and noncognitive skill development (Kassenboehmer, S., Leung, F. Schurer, S. in Oxford Economic Papers 


Join us on May 22nd when Associate Professor Stefanie Schurer will discuss the recently published paper, University education and noncognitive skill development (Kassenboehmer, S., Leung, F. Schurer, S. in Oxford Economic Papers 

The paper examines the effect of university education on students’ non-cognitive skills (NCS) using high-quality Australian longitudinal data. To isolate the skill-building effects of tertiary education, we follow the education decisions and NCS—proxied by the Big Five personality traits—of 575 adolescents over eight years. Estimating a standard skill production function, we demonstrate a robust positive relationship between university education and extraversion, and agreeableness for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. The effects are likely to operate through exposure to university life rather than through degree-specific curricula or university-specific teaching quality. As extraversion and agreeableness are associated with socially beneficial behaviours, we propose that university education may have important non-market returns.
 
Stefanie is an Associate Professor in the School of Economics at the University of Sydney. Her research interest is the Economics of Human Development. Most of her current projects explore the evolution of skills, preferences, and health over the lifecourse and the role that parents, public policy, and the medical care sector play in determining these skills. She is involved in several linked administrative data projects in Australia financed through the National Health and Medical Research Council, evaluating, among others, the impact of early-life medical care, (poor) parenting or parenting interventions, and welfare reforms on children's skill development. She is University of Sydney SOAR Fellow and an ARC Discovery Early Career Fellow. See http://www.stefanie-schurer.com/ for more information;
  • Room 612, Education Building A35
  • Tuesday 22 May 2018 from 2.00-3.30pm (join us from 1.45 for a coffee)
  • No registration needed, just come on the day
  • This seminar will be recorded
  • http://crlionline.net/node/299
Learning Nanoscience Concepts Through a Nanoscale Experience, a CRLI seminar with Dr Polly Lai

Invisible nanoscale phenomena are difficult to learn, as people have no experience of observing nanoparticles and their behaviours in everyday life.

Invisible nanoscale phenomena are difficult to learn, as people have no experience of observing nanoparticles and their behaviours in everyday life.

To help address this issue two different treatment conditions were developed: (a) working with two different Agent-Based Models (ABMs) and (b) watching two dynamic visualisations. This seminar will discuss as empirical study conducted to compare students in these two groups in terms of reasoning strategies on assessments of declarative and explanatory knowledge as well as solving transfer problems. It will look at the findings, which suggest that the ABM students’ reasoning strategies on the explanatory knowledge tasks and problem-solving activities seemed to have been influenced by the previous computationally embodied learning experience and how the dynamic visualization students seemed to rely on memory retrieval of information from the videos.Room 612, Education Building A35
  • Tuesday 29 May 2018 from 2.00-3.30pm (join us from 1.45 for a coffee)
  • No registration needed, just come on the day
  • This seminar will not be recorded
  • http://crlionline.net/node/293
Dr Polly Lai is an Educational Developer at UNSW. Before joining UNSW, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Learning Cognition Lab (LCL) led by Professor Michelene Chi at Arizona State University. Her research interests include embodied cognition based approaches involving the use of computational models and visualisations to help university students learn challenging concepts in nanoscience. Polly holds a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering, and has five years work experience with a semiconductor manufacturing company as an instructional designer developing online courses for engineering professional development. She received her PhD and Master of Learning Sciences and Technology from the University of Sydney.
Workshop with Prof Eric Tsui on the Open Curriculum project
Join us on 12 June for a special workshop presented by Professor Eric Tsui: the Open Curriculum project: Co-creation the syllabus with students and graduates on rapidly advancing business and technology areas.

Join us on 12 June for a special workshop presented by Professor Eric Tsui: the Open Curriculum project: Co-creation the syllabus with students and graduates on rapidly advancing business and technology areas.

This event is hosted by the Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation (CRLI) at Sydney School of Education and Social Work as part of our regular Tuesday Learning and Innovation Research Seminars series.

In today's networked economy, how to prepare our students to excel in a growing world of VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity of general conditions and situations)? How can we enhance students' learn to learn capabilities and confidence in presentation? Have you thought about involving students and graduates in updating your course syllabus? Come to this workshop and learn how The Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Potsdam University, Germany  have piloted a new learning pedagogy whereby students, teachers and graduates co-create a curriculum via scenario development. We shall discuss the design rationale, the approach, ways to operationalise it, feedback from students, graduates, teachers and more.
  • Room 612, Education Building A35
  • Tuesday 12 June from 2.00-3.30pm (join us from 1.45 for a coffee)
  • No registration needed, just come on the day
  • This workshop will be recorded but, due to the nature of the event and the space, in-person attendance is recommended
  • A short video summarising part of what will shared at the workshop can be played at https://youtu.be/bN3-nvdd6JA
About the presenter

Professor Eric Tsui had spent 16 years in industry with Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) in Australia taking on various capacities including Chief Research Officer and Innovation Manager. During this period, he has made significant contributions to the company’s expert systems products, applied research and innovation programmes. His speciality areas are Knowledge technologies including Search Engines, Portals, Personal Knowledge Management, Personal Learning Environments, and Knowledge Cloud services.

Professor Tsui is an honorary advisor of KM to three Hong Kong government departments. In 2014 and 2018, he twice received the Global Knowledge Management Leadership Award. He also has a strong passion in education and has received many Teaching and Learning awards in his career. He has designed and launched two MOOCs (Massive Open Online Course) -“Knowledge Management and Big Data in Business” and “Industry 4.0: How to revolutionalise your business?” on the MIT edX platform. Together, they have attracted more than 73,000 enrolments and one of them is rated as Top 7 Business MOOCs (Source: Canadian Business, April, 2018).
Back to top ^
RESEARCH
The University’s Industry and Community Engagement Seed Fund call
The University’s Industry and Community Engagement Seed Fund is now open from with applications closing on 30 May. Up to 20 grants, worth a total of $500,000 are available to help researchers engage with potential industry partners in order to build relationships and concepts before applying for an ARC Linkage Project grant or another research collaboration project with industry.

The University’s Industry and Community Engagement Seed Fund is now open from with applications closing on 30 May. Up to 20 grants, worth a total of $500,000 are available to help researchers engage with potential industry partners in order to build relationships and concepts before applying for an ARC Linkage Project grant or another research collaboration project with industry.

Successful projects will be granted up to $25,000 to meet the costs incurred in creating and fostering new industry relationships, for project consumables, equipment hire, travel, and to offer a University supported cash commitment to the project as an incentive to a potential industry partner.

Please click on READ MORE.. for further information. Applicants are required to submit a completed application form along with the applicant’s 5-page CV and letter of support from proposed partner organisation (see template example).

Deadline: Wednesday 30 May 5pm

Contact: Kate Taylor or Sherridan Blackman.
Research Students Forum

Date: Monday 4 June 2018,
Time: 4 - 8pm
Venue: 6pm Lecture Theatre 424
Keynote: Professor Janette Bobis
Research Director, Professor of Mathematics Education

 The Research’s Guide to the Galaxy … Don’t Panic!

Date: Monday 4 June 2018,
Time: 4 - 8pm
Venue:
6pm Lecture Theatre 424
Keynote:
Professor Janette Bobis Research Director, Professor of Mathematics Education
 
The Research’s Guide to the Galaxy … Don’t Panic!

In a galaxy far, far, away reigns a highly successful researcher whom everyone admires, reads their research articles, cites their work, is desirous of their numerous research grants and aspires to be ‘just like her’. While not everyone is destined to reach the research stars and search out new theoretical galaxies where no one has gone before, there are things an early career researcher can do to position themselves for a rewarding and ‘successful’ research journey.

Drawing on some of my own experiences as a researcher and research supervisor, I reflect on the journey of a researcher - from PhD to ECR to MCR and beyond. In particular, I focus on publications along the research journey. Addressing questions such as, ‘Why publish?” “Where do I publish?” “What do I publish?” “How often should I publish?” “Should I publish with my supervisor?” and much more.

Janette Bobis is a Professor of Mathematics Education and Research Director in the Sydney School of Education and Social Work. Her research, teaching and publications focus on teacher professional learning in mathematics education, and primary students’ motivation and engagement in mathematics and the impact of teaching interventions on student learning.

The Research Students Forum is a twice yearly event in which higher-degree-research students (HDRS) can showcase their research, and receive valuable feedback from academics and peers.  It’s a great opportunity to meet fellow research students from the Sydney School of Education and Social Work, find out about the pioneering research they are working on, network and just get to know each other!

You can be involved in the forum by:
 Attending to hear the latest details of our research students’ projects – deadline to register to attend is Wednesday 30 May 2018  Click here to view full details of the forum online
 
*Best Research Paper Award is a once yearly event and the prize is $500.  Click here to view further information about the Best Research Paper Award.  You can present this semester, and submit the written paper (5,000 words) for the Semester Two Research Students Forum, and be considered for the award.  That is, there is no need to present again at the Semester Two forum.
Faculty Research Support Scheme 2018 (FRSS) - REMINDER
Please find attached details of the 2018 Faculty Research Support Scheme (FRSS).
 
The applications should submitted electronically (including all attachments) to your School Research Support Officer by 5.00pm Monday 4 June 2018.
 

Please find attached details of the 2018 Faculty Research Support Scheme (FRSS).
 
The applications should submitted electronically (including all attachments) to your School Research Support Officer by 5.00pm Monday 4 June 2018.
 
Note, satisfactory completion of the Responsible Research Practice Module is essential to meet eligibility for the grant. If not yet competed, this can be accessed via Career Path from the University’s Staff Intranet – Systems logins: Career Path. Any issues of access should be directed to the Research Integrity team: research.integrity@sydney.edu.au  +61 2 8627 0200.
 
Attachments: Education leader ad 2018
FRSS_Application_Form_2018 v3FINAL
FASS_Report Template_2018

For assistance or advice please contact your RSO or fass.research@sydney.edu.au. Applications are scheduled for review in June by Research Grants & Awards Committee, with award announcements in early July.
 
Allan McConnell
Associate Dean (Research)
News and update from the SSESW Doctoral Studies Team
This is an update about Research Education (Doctoral degrees and Masters’ by research). This email is being sent to all SSESW academic staff to capture current and potential supervisors. There have been a number of changes in the last couple of years in Research Education. Some current information is below and we will go through this and other topics in the supervisors’ forum on Thursday 14th of June.
 
This is an update about Research Education (Doctoral degrees and Masters’ by research). This email is being sent to all SSESW academic staff to capture current and potential supervisors. There have been a number of changes in the last couple of years in Research Education. Some current information is below and we will go through this and other topics in the supervisors’ forum on Thursday 14th of June.
 
Roles and Responsibilities

The administration of Higher Research Degrees has been centralised. Most University administration actions (e.g. changes of supervisors, changes in candidature, etc.) are requested online by the student and processed by the Higher Degree by Research Administrative Centre (HDRAC). Our team’s contact email is hdrac.2@sydney.edu.au and phone 86274343. 
 
FASS’s A/Dean, Ruth Phillips, has oversight of school based decisions across all FASS. There are still many processes that take place at the school level and we provide support/advice on all decisions. It is important to note that we do not administer any of these processes, instead we provide academic guidance and contribute in the decision making process.  
 
School-Based Team and Roles

• HRD coordinator – Ilektra Spandagou

Contact Ilektra for any progress issues and supervision arrangements and contact point about the university’s supervisors’ registry
 
• Admissions and Enquiries coordinator –Nikki Brunker

Contact Nikki if you receive any enquiries from prospective Research Degrees students and you want someone to check eligibility.  Also for enquiries from students you are not interested, please forward them to Nikki to disseminate to other staff
 
• Thesis Proposals coordinator –Paul Ginns

Contact Paul if you want information about the Thesis Proposal process and the 1st year Turnitin substantive text submission
 
• Examinations coordinator –Lina Markauskaite

Contact Lina for questions about examiners’ nominations, examination process and examination reports

 
Research Progress Managers (RPM)
• Jenni Way
• Marie Stevenson
• Hongzhi (Veronica) Yang
• Sheelagh Daniels-Mayes

Thesis proposal meetings are chaired by one of the Research Progress Managers (or the Thesis Proposals Coordinator). RPM also draft the school’s examination reports response and chair Annual Progress Meetings
  • Research Student Liaison Officer –Suin Jung
Contact, or direct your students to contact Suin  with questions about space allocation, general enquiries, information about induction and school progress requirements, and the Research Student Forums


Information on the website

As the administration of HRD students is shared between the university, faculty and the school, it is not always obvious where to find the relevant information. A good starting point is our school website

http://sydney.edu.au/education_social_work/doctoral_studies/contacts.shtml  

In this page you can find our team, a link to the HDRAC website and links to policy and forms.
 
For your reference, some commonly looked for links are:
  1. The requirements for each Higher Research Degree:
http://sydney.edu.au/education_social_work/future_students/postgraduate_research/index.shtml

  1. Forms related to the Thesis Proposal Meeting:
Thesis proposal request form:  http://sydney.edu.au/education_social_work/doctoral_studies/forms.shtml (2nd form in the bullet list)

Thesis proposal guidelines: http://sydney.edu.au/education_social_work/students/postgraduate_research/index.shtml (under the heading: Thesis proposal review, in the first paragraph).
 
Important recent changes

First year milestone integrity check –this needs to be submitted by the student in Turnitin and discussed with supervisor – Please, direct students to HDRAC for information and advice, and you can contact Paul Ginns to discuss the process and requirements.
 
Master of Arts (Research) – a student can enrol for a MA (Research) with a primary supervisor in SSESW. MA (Research) students with a primary supervisor in SSESW are under the administration of our school in terms of progression expectations, allocation of space, etc. Information about the degree is available https://sydney.edu.au/courses/courses/pr/master-of-arts-research.html

This is in addition to existing Master of Education (Research).
 
Timely Completion – There is an increased emphasis on HDR completions due  to their contribution to Research Block Grants (RBG) Commonwealth funding for Universities. What is important to note is that completion refers to the award of the degree (not simply the submission of the thesis). Timely completions are within 4 years EFSTL for doctoral students and 2 years EFSTL for master by research students.
 
Coming events

3MT (3 Minute Thesis) Workshop for FASS HDR Students on Friday 25th of May 2018, 10:00am-12:00pm, TBA Venue (students will be informed by email). Please discuss with your students about possible participation.
 
SSESW Research Student Forum, Monday 4th of June 2018, 4 - 8pm, Keynote: Professor Janette Bobis. Deadline to submit an abstract is Sunday 27 May 2018. Please discuss with your students about presenting in the Forum.
 
FASS Supervisors' Briefing Session for all supervisors in FASS,  Friday the 8th of June 2018, 12:30-2:30, TBA Venue (by email to all supervisors in coming days). This is a briefing session about University and Faculty arrangements. It is complementary to the school’s forum so worth attending both if you have the time.
 
SSESW Supervisors’ Forum, Thursday 14th of June (after the school board meeting), Room 612, Education Building.  The forum is an opportunity to find information about key changes and how the university, faculty and school are supporting students’ candidature, from admissions to examinations. We will also discuss how best to support supervisors, both experienced ones and those starting their supervisory role.
13th University of Sydney TESOL Research Network Colloquium
Please find the following URL regarding the 13th University of Sydney TESOL Research Network Colloquium. The deadline for abstract submission is Friday 13 July, 2018 by 23.59 pm.

Click on Submit.
  

Please find the following URL regarding the 13th University of Sydney TESOL Research Network Colloquium. The deadline for abstract submission is Friday 13 July, 2018 by 23.59 pm.

Click on Submit.
  
TESOL Research Network
Dr Aek Phakiti | Associate Professor in TESOL and Postgraduate Coursework Coordinator
Reporting your publications
A reminder to academic and honorary staff and HDR students that details of your new publications should be sent to Camilla Pilgrim for entry into the University’s IRMA database.

A reminder to academic and honorary staff and HDR students that details of your new publications should be sent to Camilla Pilgrim for entry into the University’s IRMA database.
 
Academic staff and HDR students, once your publications are in IRMA they will automatically display on your profile. Please check your profiles to see if any publications are missing.

Honorary staff, publications will be added to IRMA and to your honorary profile.
 
The University’s central Research Support are currently verifying and assessing 2017 research publications. ERA eligible publications are:
 
Traditional research output types:
 
● books - authored research
● chapters in research books - authored research
● journal articles - scholarly, peer reviewed
● conference publications - full paper refereed, published in full

Non-traditional research outputs:
  • ● creative works – must have a research statement, detailing the research contribution and significance etc.
  • ● commissioned/solicited research reports for external bodies - published/publicly available
 Please provide a DOI or link to the journal article online and a link to online conference proceedings where available.

All ERA eligible publications go through a verification and assessment process by the University to ensure they meet the ERA definition of research. Publications which are not eligible – e.g. edited books, articles in professional magazines, edited journals etc. – can also be added to IRMA so they display on your profile.
Back to top ^
JOBS, NOTICES & MISCELLANEOUS
Research Assistant Needed | NESA
A NESA team needs someone who can work in NVivo and do some thematic coding of stakeholder data.   There is up to 50 hours work currently available and the likelihood of further projects.
 
The pay will be between $64 and $75 per hour. Contact Penny Lawrence pennyvlies@gmail.com

HISTORY OF UNIVERSITY LIFE Sydney Research Seminar in Higher Education
The third seminar in the History of University Life Sydney Research Seminar in Higher Education for 2018 will be Professor John Hearn, Global and Local—Success and Failure in International University Partnerships, to be held Wednesday 30 May 2018, St Paul’s College Senior Common Room, noon to 1.30pm.


Our third seminar in the History of University Life Sydney Research Seminar in Higher Education for 2018 will be Professor John Hearn, Global and Local—Success and Failure in International University Partnerships, to be held Wednesday 30 May 2018, St Paul’s College Senior Common Room, noon to 1.30pm.

Please join us for what is sure to be an interesting paper with plenty of time for discussion over a light lunch. Please RSVP to Deryck Schreuder or Julia Horne by Friday 25 May so we can confirm catering arrangements—seating is limited.
 
We would like to thank St Paul’s College for its continued support for this seminar on historical and contemporary questions in higher education including a light lunch.
 

Deryck Schreuder and Julia Horne

(HUL 2018 Organizers)



Abstract of the topic and speaker is below.
  
Global and Local


Success and Failure in International University Partnerships
 
Successful international partnerships raise the academic strength and capacity (and rankings) of the partners. They create opportunities for emerging and established academics to gain transformative international perspectives, and take knowledge leadership into the future. They enable engagement with frontiers and influence with policy development.

Failure is widespread when Universities adopt lofty strategic objectives and plans, while being naïve, cynical or clueless in international navigation, governance, assessment and resourcing. Bureaucratic inertia and managerial obstruction often doom those involved to fail. There is a better way: opportunity is international, obstacles are local.

John Hearn is Professor in the School of Medical Sciences (Physiology); Executive Director of the Worldwide Universities Network, and Chairman of the Australia Africa Universities Network. A graduate of ANU, he served in research, education and administrative leadership at the Universities of Edinburgh, London UCL, Wisconsin, ANU (DVC Research), and Sydney (DVC Academic and International 2004-13). He teaches first year and advanced physiology, has published 210 research papers, and edited six books in fertility, stem cell biology and higher education. A committed international citizen, he works globally in education and research capacity development. He is an adviser to the Australian Government, British Council, World Health Organisation, and OECD.
Research project - Educating preservice teachers to teach diverse learners: A focus on teacher educators’ epistemic reflexivities.
Please be invited to teacher educators from Universities around Australia to participate in a 3-hour workshop on Tuesday 3rd July prior to the commencement of the Australian Teacher Education Association (ATEA) conference in Melbourne 2018.

Please be invited to teacher educators from Universities around Australia to participate in a 3-hour workshop on Tuesday 3rd July prior to the commencement of the Australian Teacher Education Association (ATEA) conference in Melbourne 2018.

My colleagues Leonie Rowan, Mary Ryan, Sue Walker, Terri Bourke, Eva Johansson, Lyra L’Estrange and I are working on a research project titled Educating preservice teachers to teach diverse learners: A focus on teacher educators’ epistemic reflexivities. This ARC funded study (DP180100160) will explore how teacher educators’ epistemic reflexivity and broader contextual factors enable or constrain their pedagogical approaches when preparing preservice teachers to teach to diversity.
Attached: Info sheet.
 
In the workshop the teacher educators will be asked to reflect on:
  • ideas about what is (variously) meant by the concept of ‘student diversity’ and what effective pedagogies exist for teaching to/about diversity in teacher education
  • the pedagogies (and underpinning knowledges) identified and the challenges underlying the values and the drivers using a new framework of teaching for diversity
  • the situations or contexts in which it would be appropriate to incorporate reflexivity in approaches to teaching in the preservice units you are involved in.
We would be grateful if you could please distribute the attached email (with project information) to the teacher educators in your faculty.

Please note that this study has been approved by the QUT Human Research Ethics Committee (approval number 1800000010).

Jo Lunn Brownlee
Professor & Co-leader Teacher Education and Professional Learning research group
Sydney International Storytelling Conference
The Sydney International Storytelling Conference 1-3 June 2018 
Click on Website.

Back to top ^