ACCORD

ISSUE 17 | 31 OCTOBER 2014

 

 
 

IN THIS ISSUE

FROM THE DEAN LATEST NEWS
INSIDE THE FACULTY OUR PEOPLE IN THE NEWS
IN FOCUS ALMUNI NEWS
EVENTS EXHIBITIONS
STAY IN TOUCH

Back to top

Back to top

FROM THE DEAN

Dear alumni and friends,

I was delighted to see so many of you at our recent ‘ArtSS in the City’ event held at the Museum of Contemporary Art (see below). This has quickly become one of our most popular events, and it provides us with a wonderful opportunity to reconnect with you and update you on what is happening in the Faculty. Thank you to those of you who were able to attend and especially to those who have volunteered to help us with some of our initiatives in 2015. As I mentioned in my remarks on the night, we are keen to find new ways of connecting our current students with you so that they can learn from your experiences and wisdom. In particular, we also want to give our international students more opportunities to meet our Australian alumni and friends and have the chance to really engage with the wider University of Sydney community.  If you are interested in helping out with our new programs in 2015 please get in touch with, Kate Macfarlane, our Alumni Relations Manager.


Dear alumni and friends,

I was delighted to see so many of you at our recent ‘ArtSS in the City’ event held at the Museum of Contemporary Art (see below). This has quickly become one of our most popular events, and it provides us with a wonderful opportunity to reconnect with you and update you on what is happening in the Faculty. Thank you to those of you who were able to attend and especially to those who have volunteered to help us with some of our initiatives in 2015. As I mentioned in my remarks on the night, we are keen to find new ways of connecting our current students with you so that they can learn from your experiences and wisdom. In particular, we also want to give our international students more opportunities to meet our Australian alumni and friends and have the chance to really engage with the wider University of Sydney community.  If you are interested in helping out with our new programs in 2015 please get in touch with, Kate Macfarlane, our Alumni Relations Manager.

You may be interested to know that the Faculty has yet again performed extremely well in various global rankings that have just been announced. We have been ranked the top 20 in the world in arts in humanities in the Times Higher and QS rankings, and in the top 30 in the world for the social sciences. Although we must treat these rankings exercises with extreme care – they don’t measure everything we care about– over the past 5 years we have consistently been ranked among the top faculties of our kind in the world. This is a remarkable testament to the quality of our students and the teaching and research carried out by my colleagues.

It seems amazing, but the last ‘Insights’ lecture of the year is coming up on 6 November, featuring Professor John Romalis (Economics) on ‘The World Trade System and Global Recessions’ I look forward to seeing you there! If I don’t see you, may I take this opportunity to thank you yet again for your unstinting support of your Faculty over the course of 2014. We simply cannot do what we do without your support.

My best wishes for the holiday season.

Professor Duncan Ivison
Dean | Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences


Back to top

Back to top

LATEST NEWS

 UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY PAYS TRIBUTE TO ALUMNUS GOUGH WHITLAM  |

University of Sydney alumnus and former Australian Prime Minister Gough Whitlam has passed away this morning at the age of 98. Whitlam had a remarkable career in Australian public life, which stemmed from his early studies in both arts and law at the University of Sydney. Read the full article.

 ARTSS IN THE CITY: SEX, EVIL AND EQUATIONS  |

Set amongst the picturesque views of Sydney’s most iconic landmarks, the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences gathered its finest alumni for the fourth annual ArtSS in the City event. The night was held at the Quayside Room at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA), showcasing the beauty of Sydney, offering contrasting views of the cityscape and natural beauty of the harbour. Read the full article.

 HELP INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS FEEL AT HOME IN SYDNEY  |

The University’s refreshed Welcome to Sydney program connects new international students with current students and our alumni. It is our way of welcoming students to the University and introducing them to some of the people and places that make Sydney one of the best cities in the world.
The University’s refreshed Welcome to Sydney program connects new international students with current students and our alumni. It is our way of welcoming students to the University and introducing them to some of the people and places that make Sydney one of the best cities in the world.

Hosted by our alumni at their home or another informal setting, these events are a wonderful opportunity to connect international students with Australian families and help make students feel at home in a new city.

If you are interested in hosting our Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences International students for a Welcome to Sydney event, then please do contact Kate Macfarlane, Alumni Relations Manager for more information.

 LIVING IN TWO WORLDS  |

Frances Merenda dedicated her life to migrant welfare. At the beginning of 2009 she established the Merenda Scholarships to promote the study of Italian languages and culture, by giving students the opportunity to travel to Italy to pursue further study or research. Read the full article.

 HSC EXAM GUIDE: TOP 5 TIPS ON HOW TO BLITZ YOUR HUMANITIES EXAM  |

How do you best prepare for your exams in humanities subjects? As Dean of an Arts and Social Sciences faculty, I have been asked this question frequently when speaking to high school students over the past few months. Read the full article.

 A FORMER CHANCELLOR’S LEGACY  |

On Thursday 6 November, Professor John Romalis from the University of Sydney’s School of Economics will explore the resilience of international trade in the recent global recession compared with the Great Depression as part of the Insights 2014: Lecture Series.
On Thursday 6 November, Professor John Romalis from the University of Sydney’s School of Economics will explore the resilience of international trade in the recent global recession compared with the Great Depression as part of the Insights 2014: Lecture Series.

Professor Romalis is the first professor to hold the Sir Hermann Black Professor in Economics title -a position made possible thanks to the generosity of former Chancellor, the late Sir Hermann Black and his wife, the late Lady (Joyce) Black.

A loyal supporter of the University, it was Sir Hermann’s wish that if he outlived his wife, their estate would go to the University. Although Lady Black outlived her husband by 19 years, her will reflected his wishes and she left their estate including the home and its contents to the University in memory of her late husband.

Like Sir Hermann, Professor Romalis has a global presence, acknowledged as a world leader in international economics and trade. His research includes theoretical and empirical studies of the determinants of international trade flows including the quality of traded goods, the effects of preferential trade agreements, and the causes of the international trade collapse during the global financial crisis.

His talk at the Insights lecture series will explore this topic in more detail.

Sir Hermann and Lady Black

Sir Hermann was Chancellor of the University of Sydney from 1970 until he died in 1990, but his impact on the University Senate began well before in 1949 when he was first elected a Fellow.

He began his working life as a teacher before joining the University of Sydney as an assistant lecturer in economics in 1933. A gifted speaker, Sir Hermann was well known for his role as commentator for the Australian Broadcasting Commission from the 1930s and member of discussion panels such as The Monday Conference.

Together, Sir Hermann and Lady Black were an extraordinary couple who worked at the University for more than 30 years leaving a legacy of hard work, well established programs – including the Chancellor’s Committee and the Book Fair – and a clear vision for the future.

“The World Trade System and Global Recessions” with Professor John Romalis will take place on Thursday 6 November 2014. To book visit sydney.edu.au/alumni/insights2014.

 ARTS LAW ALUMNA SHAPING OUR MORNINGS  | By Chris Rodley

‘I did actually want to be a lawyer at one point,’ says Arts Law graduate and television producer Chloe Flynn (BA 2002, LLB 2004), ‘though I think my idea of it was more L.A. Law than day-to-day reality.’

‘I did actually want to be a lawyer at one point,’ says Arts Law graduate and television producer Chloe Flynn (BA 2002, LLB 2004), ‘though I think my idea of it was more L.A. Law than day-to-day reality.’

As she made her way through her degree, however, Chloe came to realise that her interest in law was driven by intellectual curiosity and not a desire for a legal career: ‘It became more about the chance to engage with complex issues than the subject matter itself,’ she explains. During her fourth year of study, she scored a part-time job working as an editorial assistant and website editor for a small arts and entertainment publishing company. It fascinated her, and she decided not to apply for a summer clerkship, but to focus her attention on a career in media. After graduating, she landed a job as a subeditor at Dolly magazine, and later became a subeditor at Marie Claire. Her big break came in 2007, when a friend told her that the team behind Channel 7’s Sunrise was preparing to launch a sister program entitled The Morning Show.

Unusually, they wanted segment producers from outside the television industry in order to bring a fresh perspective. ‘I wasn’t looking to work in television, but you never say no to an opportunity,’ says Chloe. She was summoned to a meeting with the then executive producer of Sunrise to discuss plans for the show. ‘I ended up staying for an hour and a half, and came away really inspired,’ she says. Taking a leap of faith, she accepted the job offer. The following year, she was promoted to the role of chief of staff at The Morning Show and, in 2010, took on her current role as Supervising Producer. In 2013, she helped launch a second news and entertainment program, The Daily Edition, where she is Acting Supervising Producer.

The dual role sees her oversee the content of three and a half hours of live television every weekday, including stories, scripts and talent. A typical day might see her wrangling a leather-clad rock-n-roll icon, a lion tamer, and almost anything in between. ‘What I love is the blend of the serious news cycle and entertainment,’ she says, ‘plus the challenge of making people care about stories they may not otherwise have exposure to.’

She gives the example of a recent episode on stroke awareness, which invited members of the public to receive blood-pressure tests live on air. ‘People thought we were nuts for considering that we could possibly keep the audience interested in stroke awareness for two and a half hours of live TV,’ she says, ‘but, not only was it a massive success for the Stroke Foundation, it also rated well.’

A key skill required in her role is making quick decisions under pressure. For example, during the show’s coverage of the visit to Australia by Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge, news broke of Barry O’Farrell’s resignation as New South Wales Premier. Chloe had to make the call to throw out the day’s schedule and switch to rolling news. ‘With live television, there’s no time to weigh up all the pros and cons, we have to react quickly — while still ensuring accuracy.’ Chloe says her law degree has stood her in good stead in such situations as it taught her the skill of processing large amounts of information efficiently. ‘Being forced to do those 10,000 word essays, go through reams of material and distil it into a clear argument really made a difference,’ she says. ‘For anyone who has survived that, putting together a rundown or a script on a complicated issue is easier.’

It also honed her ability to tell compelling stories that matter to audiences. ‘At law school, you gain an understanding not only of how the law operates, but also of the ideas underpinning public policy and politics,’ she says. ‘These are the issues that make headlines, and understanding them helps you see what is newsworthy and how the big stories of the day will impact on people’s lives.’

Her studies also gave her a grasp of media law issues, such as defamation and contempt of court, which has been invaluable: ‘I know when the alarm bells should go off and when they shouldn’t.’ Then there’s the symbolic value of an LLB, which helped to fast-track her career. ‘People trusted that I could do the job,’ she says. ‘Law is a very respected degree, which demonstrates your intellectual prowess.’ Chloe says that fellow graduates who are looking for a new career direction should keep in mind that their degree holds significant value outside the legal profession. ‘Those couple of extra years at uni prove you’re a serious candidate, and can mean you don’t have to spend double that time proving yourself on the ground,’ she says. ‘I think people don’t always realise how important the skills they’ve gained are — like problem-solving, communication, and research.’

Back to top

Back to top

INSIDE THE FACULTY

 JUNGLE ATLANTIS  | A BBC documentary

A new BBC documentary featuring Professor Roland Fletcher and Dr Damien Evans uncovers the lost city of Angkor. The documentary follows the team in Cambodia as they use new laser scanning technology to uncover the mysteries of Angkor Wat and the medieval world's greatest metropolis. Visit the Angkor Research Program or the BBC's website to find out more.

Back to top

Back to top

OUR PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

 HIGHLIGHTS  |

Radio National Canberra’s The List interviewed Professor Peter Hiscock from the Department of Archeology about his talk at the Nicholson Museum, which explored the portrayal of archaeologists in film.

The Conversation published an opinion piece by Dr Adam Kamradt-Scott from the Department of Government and International Relations about the need for mining companies to dig deep in the fight against Ebola.

CNBC (US)interviewed Adjunct Associate Professor John Lee from the Department of Government and International Relations about the political situation in Hong Kong.

Radio National Canberra’s The List interviewed Professor Peter Hiscock from the Department of Archeology about his talk at the Nicholson Museum, which explored the portrayal of archaeologists in film.

The Conversation published an opinion piece by Dr Adam Kamradt-Scott from the Department of Government and International Relations about the need for mining companies to dig deep in the fight against Ebola.

CNBC (US) interviewed Adjunct Associate Professor John Lee from the Department of Government and International Relations about the political situation in Hong Kong.

Yahoo! (New Zealand) and 环球网 (China) quoted Professor Kerry Brown from the China Studies Centre about the Fourth Plenum in China, at which China’s ruling party discussed legal reform.

Khaleej Times (UAE) reported on a workshop held by the University of Sydney in Dubai, which discussed the regulatory oversight needed for a strong financial system. A talk by Dr Mark Melatos from the School of Economics is mentioned in the article.

Professor Geoff Gallop from the Graduate School of Government was interviewed by SBS World News Australia, 720 ABC Perth and 4BC Brisbane on Gough Whitlam’s legacy. As part of the widespread reporting on Gough Whitlam’s passing, Tom Switzer from the US Studies Centre was quoted in The Sydney Morning Herald, Associate Professor James Curran from the Department of History was quoted and the Age and Canberra Times, Professor Rodney Smith from the Department of Government and International Relations was interviewed on Radio Adelaide the Wire.

The Conversation published an opinion piece by Dr Prudence Black from the Department of Gender and Culture Studies about the Qantas battle for pay equity.

ABC’s The Drum published an opinion piece by Professor John Keane from the Department of Government and International Relations about Beijing's media assault on Hong Kong citizens.

The Conversation published an opinion piece by Dr Victoria Grieves of the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies about Australian Aboriginal identity.

SBS online news published a story by Dr Sarah Walsh, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in SOPHI on The Other 9/11: Remembering Chile’s Descent into Dictatorship.

Back to top

Back to top

IN FOCUS

 ALUMNUS IN FOCUS  | Dr Paul Scully-Power AM, DSM, NSM

At the recent ArtSS in the City event held in the Museum of Contemporary Art we were delighted to welcome Australia’s first astronaut Dr Paul Scully-Power AM, DSM, NSM (BSc, DipEd, DSc), who joined us to hear about new research and ideas in the humanities and social sciences. Dr Scully-Power – who had a particularly close involvement with the debating society while studying at the University of Sydney - was the first Australian-born person to journey into space. His passion for continually learning new skills has underpinned the crucial life competences necessary for a career of such high achievement. Indeed, his views about the importance of lifelong learning and career adaptability are extremely relevant for students and graduates of the Faculty.


At the recent ArtSS in the City event held in the Museum of Contemporary Art we were delighted to welcome Australia’s first astronaut Dr Paul Scully-Power AM, DSM, NSM (BSc, DipEd, DSc), who joined us to hear about new research and ideas in the humanities and social sciences. Dr Scully-Power – who had a particularly close involvement with the debating society while studying at the University of Sydney - was the first Australian-born person to journey into space. His passion for continually learning new skills has underpinned the crucial life competences necessary for a career of such high achievement. Indeed, his views about the importance of lifelong learning and career adaptability are extremely relevant for students and graduates of the Faculty.

Dr Paul Scully-Power is now an integrator, strategist and orthogonal thinker with extensive international experience in industry, government and academia. Operating out of Washington DC he is well known for his network of people and institutions around the world.  A leader in applying technology, he has broad expertise in defense, security and intelligence, aviation and aerospace, and systems analysis and ICT. An expert in remote sensing - visible, infrared, radar and acoustic - he has worked closely with the intelligence community. He is currently engaged in cybersecurity, nano technology, secure communications, space sensors, and international government relations.

His awards include the US Navy Distinguished Service Medal, NASA Space Medal, Casey Baldwin Medallion of the Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute, United States Presidential Letter of Commendation, US Congressional Certificate of Merit, United Nations Association Distinguished Service Award, Laureate of the Albatross in oceanography, Order of the Decibel in acoustics, and Australia's highest aviation award, the Oswald Watt Gold Medal. He is a Member of the Order of Australia and a Grand Officer of the Star of Ethiopia. A larger than life-size oil painting of Dr Scully-Power hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra, Australia.

What are your happiest memories about your time here as a student?

There are many happy memories, but perhaps the most poignant are the one-on-one interactions with the Professors, the SRC, the Debating Society, and being part of the University community. I was very fortunate in having an office in the Maths Department as an undergraduate.

Who was your favourite Professor while you were a student at the University of Sydney and why?

The most impressive was Professor T.G Room, the Head of the School of Mathematics. I recall him walking across the campus in full regalia of a DSc, and thought that I would never attain such status.

What is your proudest achievement?

Most would assume going up into space, but I am very fortunate in that I have been blessed with many opportunities. To have been able to have an impact on technology in the broadest possible sense with applications across the board both nationally and internationally is most satisfying.

Who inspires you?

The most impressive person who I have met is Stephen Hawking when I was at Cambridge. His mind is “mind boggling” and his ability to be able to communicate using only two fingers to activate a computer that produces a synthetic voice is an inspiration to all.

Tell us more about yourself and how you ultimately became Australia’s First Astronaut

I was fortunate in being sent on exchange from the Australian Navy to the US Navy. At that time I was already a Principal Investigator for a NASA program, and had the opportunity of working with Dr Bob Stevenson at the Office of Naval Research. Bob was a scientific instructor in the Astronaut Office, and took me under his wing. The rest is history.

What is the mantra you live by and what drives you?

When you come to a fork in the road – take it. Have fun, and to thine own self be true.

What has been the most memorable success you have had?

I have been blessed with an outstanding family of wife Frannie and six children.

What are your plans for the future?

To find the lost city of Atlantis. I would also like to contribute in a meaningful way to the advancement of Australia as a nation.

What advice would you give to students graduating from the University of Sydney?

Change is the only constant. You will probably have about seven different jobs in your career. Graduating from the University of Sydney is the first step. You will need to keep up academically, learn new skills, and apply yourself across a broad range of new endeavours.

Image credit: Evert Ploeg

Back to top

Back to top

ALMUNI NEWS

 2014 ALUMNI AWARD RECIPIENTS  | Congratulations to Peter Hobbins

Congratulations to Peter Hobbins who won the Rita and John Conforth Medal for PhD acheivement at this year's Alumni Achievement Awards ceremony on Friday 17 October. The award was established in 2011 to honour PhD graduates who have achieved academic excellence and enriched the diverse life of the University and the broader community.
Congratulations to Peter Hobbins who won the Rita and John Conforth Medal for PhD acheivement at this year's Alumni Achievement Awards ceremony on Friday 17 October. The award was established in 2011 to honour PhD graduates who have achieved academic excellence and enriched the diverse life of the University and the broader community.

Peter’s doctoral thesis, on snakes and snakebite in colonial Australia, was described by one examiner as “one of the best, if not the best, I have ever examined”. On the strength of his academic work, he was appointed to a research associate position while still a PhD student.

“The past is endlessly fascinating. I love exploring its traces in memories, documents, objects and landscapes. As the discipline of seeing and shaping how the past is understood, historians tell its stories, outline its structures and conjecture about its possibilities. The joy of history lies in the craft of writing, in balancing evidence and language to connect one account of the past to our present. My focus is on making the past meaningful. As a historian of science and medicine, my intention is to remind a wide audience that knowledge is a negotiable platform for possibility, rather than a rigid scaffold of inevitability.

My advice to students: the value of attending university is not in learning information or procedures, it comes from finding ways to evaluate, apply and adapt what you know while everything changes around and within you.”

Click here for more information about the presentation ceremony.

Back to top

Back to top

EVENTS

 2014 INSIGHTS LECTURE SERIES  | Professor John Romalis

The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences is delighted to invite you to the next lecture as part of the Insights 2014: Lecture Series, The World Trade System and Global Recessions with Professor John Romalis from the School of Economics.

When: Thursday 6 November 2014
Where: Refreshments at 5:30pm in the Nicholson Museum Quadrangle. The lecture will commence at 6pm in General Lecture Theatre 1, Quadrangle, the University of Sydney
Cost: $10
RSVP: Click here for more information and bookings

Visit the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences website for the full 2015 Insights Lecture Series program which will be available online shortly.

 MORE EVENTS  |

Back to top

Back to top

EXHIBITIONS

 NICHOLSON MUSUEM  |

Actors, Athletes and Academics: Life in Ancient Greece
This exhibition showcases material from ancient Greece and South Italy, exploring themes of theatre, religion, wine drinking, education, childhood, marriage, war and athletics.

Find out more about Museum events and activities.

Back to top

Back to top

STAY IN TOUCH

 STAY CONNECTED  | Update your contact details online

Stay connected and receive the latest news and events from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences by updating your contact details.

For further information about the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Alumni program, please contact Kate Macfarlane.

 WEIBO ACCOUNT  | Alumni in China

For our alumni in China, we encourage you to stay connected to the University by following our Weibo account. Staying in touch allows us to invite you to special alumni events, including the upcoming Tai Ji and Wellbeing gathering on 9 November in Shanghai.

Back to top

Back to top
CONNECT
Facebook Twitter YouTube

© 2014 The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia
Phone +61 2 9351 2222 ABN 15 211 513 464 CRICOS Number: 00026A

Disclaimer | Privacy statement | University of Sydney