FACULTY OF VETERINARY SCIENCE

MAY 2015

Research Newsletter 

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EVENTS

From the Desk of the ADR

We received 114 individual applications for DVC-R compacts and research bequests. We distributed $235K in Compact Funding and $91,104 in Bequests.

I acknowledge the efforts of our review committees.

DVC-R compacts

Industry and DPI: Helen Jones and Jef Hammond

Intramural: Paul Sheehy and David Raubenheimer

Bequests: Ros Bathgate and David Phalen

Student travel awards: Kendra Kerrisk and Navneet Dhand.

Thank you to the review committees for the work that they put into making these decisions. It was a tough job and the competition was high.





We received 114 individual applications for DVC-R compacts and research bequests. We distributed $235K in Compact Funding and $91,104 in Bequests.

I acknowledge the efforts of our review committees.

DVC-R compacts

Industry and DPI: Helen Jones and Jef Hammond

Intramural: Paul Sheehy and David Raubenheimer

Bequests: Ros Bathgate and David Phalen

Student travel awards: Kendra Kerrisk and Navneet Dhand.

Thank you to the review committees for the work that they put into making these decisions. It was a tough job and the competition was high.


COMPACT FUNDING FOR 2015

COMPACT PROJECTS WITH MATCHING DPI FUNDS:- TOTAL $53,000

Effect of varying plane of nutrition on embryo loss in ewes. 
Ros Bathgate/ Simon deGraaf/ Gordon Refshauge (DPI)

Linking veterinary dairy data to benefit dairy cow health, disease surveillance and veterinary practices in NSW.
Cameron Clark/ Nicholas Lyons (DPI)/ Dianne Ryan (DPI)/ Michael Ward

Rapid detection and  characterisation of veterinary pathogens that represent biosecurity risks to terrestrial and aquatic livestock.
Karren Plain, Paul Hick, Ian Marsh (DPI), Valin Reja(DPI)

An investigation into the prevalence of Coxiella burnetii (Q fever) in ruminants in the Central Tablelands of NSW. 
Kate Bosward, Paul Sheehy, Ian Marsh (DPI), Shayne Fell (DPI)

Transmission and control of bovine Theileriosis. 
David Emery, Jan Slapeta, Cheryl Jenkins (DPI) and Melinda Gabor (DPI)

Comparative parasite resistance and resilience of the Camden Park heritage sheep flock.
David Emery, Jan Slapeta, Narelle Sales (DPI)

COMPACT PROJECTS WITH MATCHING COMPANION ANIMALS TOTAL  $50,000

Towards a genetic test for Chronic Superficial Keratitis in the Racing Greyhound. Claire Wade, Australian Greyhound Veterinary Association

Investigation into modified release medicines for companion animals. 
Merran Govendir,  Australian Compounding Pharmaceuticals (ACPharm)

The detection of gene doping in Thoroughbred racehorses.  Natasha Hamilton,  Racing Australia

Cross-species canine parvovirus (CPV) transmission in Australia – are cats silent spreaders?  Vanessa Barrs, Boehringer Ingelheim

Effect of feeding on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of existing and novel formulations of pimobendan in healthy adult dogs. 
Niek Beijerink, Luoda Pharma

 

INTRAMURAL COMPACT FUNDING TOTAL $70,000

Tamara Leahy,  Ben Crossett (CPC )
Cameron Clark,  David Raubenheimer ( CPC)
Vanessa Barrs,  Edward Holmes (CPC)
Julia Beatty,  Nicholas King (CPC/ MBI)
Jan Slapeta,  Cameron Webb, Grant Hill-Cawthorne ( MBI)
Niek Beijerink,  Brett Hambly (CPC)
Navneet Dhand, MBI


Travel Support Funds $12,000
Rachael Gray,
Natasha Hamilton
Hamutal Mazrier
Catherine Grueber

Research Student Support – Honors  $12,000
Bianca  Haase  -  Georgina  Samaha
Rachael  Gray  -  Alex  Pan
Rachael  Gray -  Shannon  Taylor
Jan  Slapeta -  Emily Onizawa
Jan  Slapeta -  Madalyn  Cooper
Katrina  Bosward -  Juliette  Dean
Katrina  Bosward -  Emma  Ludington
Merran  Govendir -  Michelle  Lau
Natasha  Hamilton -  Angelica  Pickup
Natasha  Hamilton -  Evelyn  Todd
Cameron  Clark -  Alexandra  Green
Jenny-Ann  Toribio - Emillee  Lay
 

Research Student Support – PhD  $38,000
Siobhan Mor - Christine  Atherstone
Alex Chaves - Stephanie Coufal-Majewski
Mark Krockenberger - Laura Schmertmann
Katia Voss - Lucinda Barton
Sabrina Lomax - Charissa  Harris
Catherine Grueber - Caitlin Morrison
Cathy Herbert - Holly Cope
 

Bequest Funding for 2015
Natasha Hamilton
Unravelling the genetics underlying soundness and selection in Thoroughbred racehorses: examining a champion

Niek Beijerink
Natriuretic Peptide System in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with Mitral Valve Disease with a candidate gene approach

Navneet Dhand
What are the risk factors for obesity in cats? Does cat obesity have an impact on cat welfare

Hamutal Mazrier
IL-7 receptor subunit alpha (CD127) gene variances associated with immune related diseases in the Matif-like dog breeds

Julia Beatty
Are feline haemoplasmas cotransmitted with the feline gammaherpesvirus?

Cameron E. F. Clark
Sensing cow behaviour

Rachael Gray
The endangered Australian sea lion Neophoca cinerea - the significance and drivers of endemic hookworm disease

Merran Govendir
Pharmacology of fentanyl patches to minimise pain in koalas

Vanessa Barrs
Characterising the immune-response in feline upper respiratory aspergillosis – an immunohistochemical study

Katrina Bosward

Investigation of emergence of decreased antimicrobial susceptibility in Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from Australian dairy cows

Catherine Herbert
“i-Roo”: Development of novel technology to support wildlife research and community engagement in science education

Mark Krockenberger
The link between a specialist diet and the immune function of the koala in the modern world.

Peter Williamson
Lymphoma in Australian Bullmastiffs

Fernando Martinez Taboada
Epidural cephalic spread of local anaesthetic in cats based spinal length

Vanessa Barrs
Treating the untreatable: can caspofungin cure fatal feline infections?

Julia Beatty
Can we vaccinate dogs to prevent lymphoma?

Cameron E. F. Clark
Automated sow oestrus detection

 MEDIA  | Who's has been creating news............

Colleagues who have featured in the media:-

The Land reported on the University of Sydney’s Farm Dog Project , which involves DNA analysis of working dogs.


666 ABC Canberra
interviewed Professor Paul McGreevy from the Faculty of Veterinary Science about the benefits of playing music to animals.

Dr Kendra Kerrisk: Raising Calves for Robotic Milking, in the Australian Dairy Farmer.

Vet Practice Magazine reported the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science was ranked the top veterinary school in Australia. Dean of the Faculty, Professor Rosanne Taylor, was quoted.

The Land reported on the University of Sydney’s Farm Dog Project , which involves DNA analysis of working dogs.


666 ABC Canberra
interviewed Professor Paul McGreevy from the Faculty of Veterinary Science about the benefits of playing music to animals.

Dr Kendra Kerrisk: Raising Calves for Robotic Milking, in the Australian Dairy Farmer.

Vet Practice Magazine reported the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science was ranked the top veterinary school in Australia. Dean of the Faculty, Professor Rosanne Taylor, was quoted.
 

Top veterinary schools in Australia & New Zealand 
 
Faculty a global leader in QS World University Rankings  
  
Dr Peter Higgins from the Faculty of Veterinary Science was interviewed on 702 ABC Sydney about dog owners training their pets.

Radio New Zealand interviewed Professor Katherine Belov, Faculty of Veterinary Science, about her research on Tasmanian Devils.  

ABC (South East NSW, Gippsland) interviewed Professor Richard Whittington from the Faculty of Veterinary Science about a new study which assists in identifying footrot in sheep.

Robotic’s play Fetch

A reminder if you have any research or findings that you think are suitable for media coverage please contact verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu or 9351 4312 before your work is published.


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30 SECONDS WITH... HARKEET PURIA, DEVELOPMENT OFFICER

30 Seconds with... Harkeet Puria, Development Officer

In this edition we meet  Harkeet Puria, Development Officer for the Faculty of Veterinary Science.

1.  What is your area of expertise?  I graduated with a Bachelor of Science, in Psychology from The University of Birmingham (UK) in 2008. I join the Faculty of Veterinary Science as Development Officer from The Fred Hollows Foundation, where I relationship managed high-value Donors & Corporate partners. I have spent the last 7 years working in the Not-for-profit sector; in the development and growth of the Volunteering, Major Donor, Corporates, Workplace Giving and Community Partnerships programs. 
  
2.   Most exciting PART OF YOUR ROLE? Working with generous people to find out what their philanthropic passion is. Asking for a major gift can be nerve-wracking but very exciting at the same time, especially when they say yes! 

 3.    What ARE YOU EXCITED ABOUT ACHIEVING? I’m looking forward to learning about the ground-breaking research and activities the Faculty of Veterinary Science is carrying out. I have set myself a goal to bring in a million dollar (plus) gift to the Faculty from an individual major donor in their lifetime, to help shape a better future for animals.

  
4.   Something about you that we don’t know  

  • I am a budding photographer
  • I have a twin sister in the UK who is expecting her first baby
  • Friends and family claim to be addicted to my home-baked triple-chocolate cookies!

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OPPORTUNITES CLOSING IN JUNE/JULY 2015

Opportunites closing in June/July 2015

The following opportunities are some of the listed granting opportunities you can find on Research Professional.
Meat and livestock Australia new scientist award
The Society for Reproductive Biology invites applications to its meat and livestock Australia new scientist award.

This recognises the best oral presentation in the field of livestock research at the annual scientific meeting by a postgraduate student or researcher within eight years of receiving their PhD award on 12 June 2015.

PhD and MD students in their second year and above and PhD and MD graduates who have been members of the society for at least six months prior to applying are eligible. Honours and master’s students and first-year PhD students must be SRB members at the time of submission of the application.

The award is worth AU$3,000.

Closing Date 12th June 2015
Margaret Middleton Fund for endangered Australian native vertebrate animals
The Australian Academy of Science invites applications for its science grants from the Margaret Middleton Fund for endangered Australian native vertebrate animals. These support ecological field research and conservation-based research of Australian ecosystems leading to tangible outcomes for management with the scope of research open to terrestrial, marine and freshwater research on vertebrate animals. Preference will be given to novel research which deals with empirical field-based data and ecological community processes with possible management implications rather than pure genetic or modelling research. The work should lead to publication in high-quality ecological or conservation journals.

Applicants must be Australian citizens or permanent residents. They should also be enrolled for a PhD and hold an Australian postgraduate award or university scholarship, or be within three years of obtaining a PhD and hold a postdoctoral position at a recognised institution.

Grants are worth up to AU$15,000 over a period of 18 to 24 months. Journal page charges of up to AU$2,000 may be supported.

Closing Date 15th June 2015
Australian Small Animal Veterinary Association-Student Scholarships
The Australian Small Animal Veterinary Association invites applications for its student scholarships. These are given to student members for continuing education and for an opportunity to network with like-minded professionals.

Applicants must be student members of the society across Australia.

Three scholarships, worth AU$1,500 each, are available to cover full registration to the annual conference, accommodation and return airfares from the nearest capital city of the student’s campus

Closing Date 15th June
Brain Foundation Annual Research Gifts
The 2015 Research Gifts Program is now open to all applicants. Applications will be accepted until Friday 26 June 2015. The attached link above takes you directly to the application guidelines, application form and membership form:




 

Norman Borlaug award for field research and application
The World Food Prize Foundation, with an endowment from the Rockefeller Foundation, invites nominations for the Norman Borlaug award for field research and application. This is awarded for an exceptional, science-based achievement in international agriculture and food production by an individual who has clearly demonstrated intellectual courage, stamina and determination in the fight to eliminate global hunger and poverty. The award honours an individual who is working closely and directly in the field or at the production or processing level with farmers, animal herders, fishers or others in rural communities, in any discipline or enterprise across the entire food production, processing and distribution chain.

Nominees must be under the age of 40 on 16 October of the year in which the award is presented. Nominations must be submitted in English.

The award is worth US$10,000

Closing Date 30 Jun 15 (Forecast)
Morris Animal Foundation - Blue Buffalo Foundation for Cancer Research
Morris Animal Foundation

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP)

MORRIS ANIMAL FOUNDATION - BLUE BUFFALO FOUNDATION FOR CANCER RESEARCH
Veterinary Fellowship for Small Companion Animal Nutrition

DEADLINE: July 1, 2015, 11:59 p.m. EST

Background: Morris Animal Foundation (MAF) was founded in 1948 by Mark L. Morris Sr., a veterinary nutritionist who envisioned a world in which scientific discoveries would transform the health of animals. MAF is currently funding approximately 300 health studies that benefit companion animals and wildlife around the world. Blue Buffalo Foundation for Cancer Research (BBFCR) was established in 2003 to provide a source of funds for programs dedicated to gaining a greater understanding of the causes, treatments and prevention of dog and cat cancer. Both MAF and BBFCR recognize the need to train future researchers to advance the science critical to improving animal health. Together, they have created this unique training award in veterinary nutrition.

Program Description: The MAF/BBFCR Fellowship in Small Companion Animal Nutrition is a two year award made to an institutional training program that will provide salary support for a post-DVM or post-PhD student pursuing post-doctoral research training in companion animal nutrition. Up to $118,000 is available for salary support of this fellowship. This includes $50,000 per year plus a maximum of 8% indirect costs. Additionally, $3,000-$5,000 per year will be available for scientific travel including presentation of research findings at relevant meetings, and visits to BBFCR headquarters in Connecticut and MAF in Colorado.

All funded proposals must meet Morris Animal Foundation’s Health Study Policy for Animals involved in Research

For more information:
Small cat action fund
Panthera invites letters of intent for its small cat action fund. This supports in situ conservation and research activities .

Applications from large first world universities will only be considered when applicants are from developing countries.

Funding of up to US$15,000 is available for projects lasting one year. Preference will be given to requests specifically for field conservation and research activities, including equipment, transportation and local salaries.

Closing date 1st July 2015

Gardiner Foundation



Gardiner Foundation is offering $1.5 million over 3 years to an excellent, cohesive and collaborative program of research, development and / or extension that meets the challenge of:
Improving home grown forage utilisation through the use of novel and innovative practice change
models to increase the number of dairy farms that achieve three goals collectively:

•  home grown forage consumption greater than 1tDM per hectare per 100mm of rainfall and
irrigation.
•  1 kg milk solids production per kg of cow live weight.
•  total feed costs less than 40% of total farm income.

Proposals are due by

3 July 2015, and will be competitively assessed against the criteria of:

 Significance

 Globally excellent RD & E

 Team quality and capability

 Collaboration

For Application Guidelines, visit

www.gardinerfoundation.com.au/funding_programs

or contact Aaron Gosling, Innovation Program Manager, at

aaron.gosling@gardinerfoundation.com.au

Completed application forms must be sent to

challenge@gardinerfoundation.com.au.

Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment postgraduate research grants
Equity Trustees, under the Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment, invites applications for its postgraduate research grants. These enable postgraduate students to conduct research on ecology, wildlife management or natural history. Applications in three general areas are especially encouraged:

•wildlife management relating to sport hunting, harvesting, pest control, management of non-game animals, and effect of land management on native species;

•conservation biology and biodiversity, studies relating to the management of protected areas and rare or threatened species in Australia;

•field work on Australian native plants and animals to gain understanding of ecological interactions, population dynamics, animal behaviour and species distribution.

Preference will be given to students in an early stage of a doctoral programme at an Australian university. Master’s and honours projects will normally not be supported. Grants are not available to individuals but are made only to organisations to which gifts are deductible under section 30-15 of the federal income tax assessment act.

Grants are worth up to AU$7,500 per year and renewable for a period of two to three years. The total conference travel budget for the project is limited to AU$3,000.

Closing Date 31 July 2015

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HERDC OR ERA – SIMILAR BUT DIFFERENT

The all important tips to get the best results!

HERDC (Higher Education Research Data Collection) is a yearly collection of RESEARCH ONLY publications which must follow certain criteria :-

HERDC (Higher Education Research Data Collection) is a yearly collection of RESEARCH ONLY publications which must follow certain criteria :-

Journal

Must be published in the collection year

If in a print journal must have page numbers

Paper must be refereed – in a journal cited by Ulrich or Thomson’s ICI

Must be original research – Reviews DO NOT count

Must be more than 1 page long

Research done while employed by the University - Affiliation with the University –“The University of Sydney” MUST appear

Conference

In the collection year

Must be a refereed paper

NOT an abstract

In a printed proceedings, CD or online

ISBN number, Editor, Table of Contents, front page, proof of affiliation with the University is needed

Must be a recognised Domestic or International Conference ( not a University of Sydney Internal)

Book/Book Chapter

Not a textbook

To be added you must supply:-

Front page, Editorial information, ISBN, Table of Contents, Forward, Complete chapter

ERA

ERA (Excellence in Research in Australia)

ERA evaluates the quality of the research undertaken in Australian universities against national and international benchmarks.  The ratings are determined and moderated by committees of distinguished researchers, drawn from Australia and overseas.  The unit of evaluation is broadly defined as the Field of Research (FoR) within an institution based on the Australia and New Zealand Standard Classification (ANZSRC).  The indicators used in ERA include a range of metrics such as citation profiles which are common to disciplines in the natural sciences the more citations in High Impact journals the better
ERA (Excellence in Research in Australia)

ERA evaluates the quality of the research undertaken in Australian universities against national and international benchmarks.  The ratings are determined and moderated by committees of distinguished researchers, drawn from Australia and overseas.  The unit of evaluation is broadly defined as the Field of Research (FoR) within an institution based on the Australia and New Zealand Standard Classification (ANZSRC).  The indicators used in ERA include a range of metrics such as citation profiles which are common to disciplines in the natural sciences the more citations in High Impact journals the better

 

The standards for Journals, Conference Book and Book Chapter are the same as HERDC with two  differences

1)  Spans a 6 year period

2) if you are now employed by the University of Sydney but the paper was from your previous employment it is counted as University of Sydney

ERA occurs every 2 years so the next one is 2016 which will span 2009 – 2014 and is highly prestigious if your Faculty is on 5 (at present Veterinary Science UoS is a 5 but Animal production is a 3)

NTO  (Non Traditional output)

Eligibility

Body external to University

Credit the author – MUST state affiliation with University of Sydney

Must be original research

May be eligible if a working or discussion paper – will be audited

Ineligible

Blog

Commentary

Survey

To check if you think you are eligible :-  www.sydney.edu.au/research_support/reporting/ntro/index.shtml

The take home message to this is – think about the Impact Factor of the journals and your citations flowing from that – always put the correct affiliation address as if incorrect it is not always picked up by Scopus or Google Scholar and your paper can be missed out :-

Faculty of Veterinary Science

The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia

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PUBLICATIONS

IRMA April 2015

Publications as listed on IRMA.
Remember to send your publications to:- kim.heasman@sydney.edu.au


  

  

 

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TRAINING COURSES

Animal Ethics Training course

Introduction to Animal Research: Welfare and Ethics (ITAR) course. The ITAR course has been restructured this year in response to feedback from attendees. It will now be run in a modular format, to allow attendees to choose the topics that are relevant to their particular project.

The next ITAR module, Fundamentals of animal research, is scheduled for Monday 1st June 2015. Please check the animal ethics website for further details, including dates and registration.

Introduction to Animal Research: Welfare and Ethics (ITAR) course The ITAR course has been restructured this year in response to feedback from attendees. It will now be run in a modular format, to allow attendees to choose the topics that are relevant to their particular project.

The next ITAR module, Fundamentals of animal research, is scheduled for Monday 1st June 2015. Please check the animal ethics website for further details, including dates and registration.

The ITAR course has been restructured this year in response to feedback from attendees. It will now be run in a modular format, to allow attendees to choose the topics that are relevant to their particular project.

The ‘Introduction to Animal Research: Ethics and Welfare’ (ITAR) course aims to encourage ethical conduct in animal research, and maximise compliance with animal research and teaching legislation. It is a mandatory training course for all new animal researchers.

There will be six modules:
1.      Fundamentals of animal research – this module covers legislation and the Code, ethics, workplace health and safety, the 3R’s and humane endpoints.
Small laboratory animals
  1. Wildlife
  2. Livestock
  3. Anaesthesia and survival surgery
  4. IRMA – this module covers how to use the IRMA system. It is an optional module.

Each module will be offered up to four times a year, depending on demand. The course will be delivered by guest lecturers with expertise in that particular area, alongside staff from the Research Integrity and Ethics Administration team (Animal Welfare Veterinarian, Ethics Officers and Ethics Manager).

The next ITAR module, Fundamentals of animal research, is scheduled for Monday 1st June 2015. Please check the animal ethics website for further details, including dates and registration

Chemical Safety Management Standards

Safety Health & Wellbeing has recently reviewed the University’s standards in relation to chemical safety. The new Chemical Safety Standards were endorsed by the SEG Work Health & Safety Committee in February.

 The Chemical Safety standards outline the University’s minimum performance requirements for chemical safety.  WHS Services are available to partner with faculties, schools and research institutes to provide practical guidance in implementation. 

 Can you please forward this email to all relevant staff in your faculty or school.

I also remind you of the Fieldwork Safety Standards and Electrical Safety Standard which were released in 2014.

For more information and queries contact Safety Health and Wellbeing on 9351 5555. 

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DATES TO NOTE

 NOMINATIONS OPEN MAY 2015  | Fresh Science is back in 2015

Stories of discovery from early-career researchers around Australia

Fresh Science is a communication boot camp for researchers no more than five years out from their PhD. We teach them essential communication skills and get their stories out to local, national and international media

 WEDNESDAY, 3RD JUNE 2015  | Foodborne and Zoonotic Disease Surveillance: Genomics, Metagenomics, and the Road Ahead

Dr John Besser, Deputy Chief Enteric Diseases Laboratory Branch, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  

 Advanced technology is changing the field of microbiology at an unprecedented rate, opening up opportunities and challenges for public health that were not imaginable a few years ago.  In the area of foodborne disease surveillance, successive laboratory and epidemiology innovations during the last 20 years have increasingly made it possible to detect and solve distributed outbreaks caused by problems in the food supply that would not otherwise have been recognized.  Will the real-time use of NGS technology make it possible to detect more outbreaks more quickly and make them easier to solve?  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in collaboration with multiple U.S. and International agencies and all 50 U.S. states, initiated a nationwide real-time whole genome sequencing (WGS)-based surveillance project for Listeriamonocytogenesin late 2013.  .

Dr John Besser, Deputy Chief Enteric Diseases Laboratory Branch, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  

 Advanced technology is changing the field of microbiology at an unprecedented rate, opening up opportunities and challenges for public health that were not imaginable a few years ago.  In the area of foodborne disease surveillance, successive laboratory and epidemiology innovations during the last 20 years have increasingly made it possible to detect and solve distributed outbreaks caused by problems in the food supply that would not otherwise have been recognized.  Will the real-time use of NGS technology make it possible to detect more outbreaks more quickly and make them easier to solve?  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in collaboration with multiple U.S. and International agencies and all 50 U.S. states, initiated a nationwide real-time whole genome sequencing (WGS)-based surveillance project for Listeriamonocytogenesin late 2013.  Impacts were immediate, with Listeriaoutbreaks dominating headlines. Lessons learned will be presented, along with a description of the nationwide wgMLST-based infrastructure developed to monitor foodborne diseases, and in-progress research into electronic cluster recognition. Uses of NGS technology for other diseases such as ebola and influenza will be described along with applications for metagenomics that are rapidly emerging from the realm of science fiction into public health practice.

 Date: Wednesday, 3rd June 2015

Time: 3pm – 4pm
Dr John Besser, Deputy Chief Enteric Diseases Laboratory Branch, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  

 Advanced technology is changing the field of microbiology at an unprecedented rate, opening up opportunities and challenges for public health that were not imaginable a few years ago.  In the area of foodborne disease surveillance, successive laboratory and epidemiology innovations during the last 20 years have increasingly made it possible to detect and solve distributed outbreaks caused by problems in the food supply that would not otherwise have been recognized.  Will the real-time use of NGS technology make it possible to detect more outbreaks more quickly and make them easier to solve?  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in collaboration with multiple U.S. and International agencies and all 50 U.S. states, initiated a nationwide real-time whole genome sequencing (WGS)-based surveillance project for Listeriamonocytogenesin late 2013.  Impacts were immediate, with Listeriaoutbreaks dominating headlines. Lessons learned will be presented, along with a description of the nationwide wgMLST-based infrastructure developed to monitor foodborne diseases, and in-progress research into electronic cluster recognition. Uses of NGS technology for other diseases such as ebola and influenza will be described along with applications for metagenomics that are rapidly emerging from the realm of science fiction into public health practice.

 Date: Wednesday, 3rd June 2015

Time: 3pm – 4pm

Location: Level 2 Conference Room C2.20

Westmead Millenium Institute, Westmead, Sydney

RSVP & Enquiries: lou.orszulak@health.nsw.gov.au

 5TH JUNE 2015  | APAs are now open

Applications for semester 2, 2015 APAs are now open!

These are for domestic students who have an Hons 1 or equivalent degree who will commence an higher degree by research degree semester 2, 2015. No deferrals are permitted for successful students in semester 2, 2015.

 

Remember that the student must apply to be admitted to the Faculty for the degree via Sydney Student. If they have not been admitted to the degree by the Faculty, their application for an APA is not considered. Could you please let Tess know if there are any students applying through Sydney Student so that we can keep a look out for their application.

 

The students must also submit an application for the APA application form 

  

Please contact the Associate Dean of Postgraduate Programs Dr Merran Govendir for any additional information.

 JUNE 8, 2015 - JUNE 9, 2015  | IOM workshop: Role of Clinical Studies for Pets with Naturally Occurring Tumors in Translational Cancer Research

“The Role of Clinical Studies for Pets with Naturally Occurring Tumors in Translational Cancer Research”

http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Disease/NCPF/2015-JUN-08.aspx 

When: June 8, 2015 - June 9, 2015

Where: Keck Center of the National Academy of Sciences, 500 Fifth St. NW, Washington, DC

Topics: Biomedical and Health Research, Diseases, Health Care Workforce, Health Services, Coverage, and Access, Quality and Patient Safety

Activity: National Cancer Policy Forum

Board: Board on Health Care Services

 27TH JULY 2015  | Sydney Catalyst International Translational Cancer Research Symposium

International and local leaders in translational cancer research will gather in Sydney on Monday to attend the second Sydney Catalyst International Translational Cancer Research Symposium.

International and local leaders in translational cancer research will gather in Sydney on Monday http://sydney.edu.au/scholarships/research/postgraduate_awards.shtml to attend the second Sydney Catalyst International Translational Cancer Research Symposium
  

The outstanding panel of speakers at this year’s Symposium includes Dr Robert J Birnbaum Vice President, Continuing Professional Development and Implementation Science, Partners Healthcare, and the Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School and Professor Derek Raghavan, President of the Levine Cancer Institute.
 
Local experts from across the translational spectrum include Professor David Thomas from the Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Neurosurgeon Dr Brindha Shivalingham, Professor John Rasko from the Centenary Institute and Professor Jon Emery the Herman Professor of Primary Care Cancer Research at the University of Melbourne.





 15TH AND 16TH SEPTEMBER 2015  | National Students for Sustainability professional conference

The University of Western Sydney (UWS) will be hosting a national Students for Sustainability (S4S) professional conference on the 15th and 16th September 2015. The conference theme "HOPE for the future" will explore the social and environmental impacts of our society and focus on empowering our youth with knowledge and skills to lead into an uncertain future. The S4S conference will provide students with the opportunities to network with like-minded peers and industry professionals, to professionally present and share their game changing solutions or stories of success, whilst advancing their own knowledge of current and emerging sustainability issues outside of their discipline areas. The conference streams will focus on food, ethics and environment with the underpinning notions of sustainability, design and innovation.

 

The University of Western Sydney (UWS) will be hosting a national Students for Sustainability (S4S) professional conference on the 15th and 16th September 2015. The conference theme "HOPE for the future" will explore the social and environmental impacts of our society and focus on empowering our youth with knowledge and skills to lead into an uncertain future. The S4S conference will provide students with the opportunities to network with like-minded peers and industry professionals, to professionally present and share their game changing solutions or stories of success, whilst advancing their own knowledge of current and emerging sustainability issues outside of their discipline areas. The conference streams will focus on food, ethics and environment with the underpinning notions of sustainability, design and innovation.

 

S4S differs from other student-led conference as it is a professional styled, multi-disciplinary  conference for students, with the aim to provide and improve their communication and presentation skills in a professional and supportive environment. Presenting at S4S will assist with their speaking skills and confidence, whilst developing sustainability literate graduates. The conference will provide assistance, training and mentoring to presenting students through a series of free online webinars.Anyone can attend the S4S conference, however only presentations and poster presentations are open to current undergraduate and honours students from any university degree, regionally and internationally. Student presentation and posters must showcase innovative, game changing ideas and solutions or stories of success within their institutions or community, addressing the solution to one or more of our conference streams. Students can present as individuals or in a small team. To present students must submit a short 500-1,000 word proposal before the 1st June 2015. All submissions will be judged by an independent UWS panel.

 

As additional support, current domestic undergraduate or honours students who are presenting (excludes poster presentation) have the opportunity to apply for financial conference assistance packages. This financial assistance will help cover domestic air fares and on campus accommodation, as well as the waiving of the full conference fee. UWS is sponsoring 10 x $500 conference assistant packages which students must apply before the 5th of June. All submissions are judged by an independent UWS panel.

 

To assist with the success of the S4S conference we ask that you please consider the information provided and send it to the relevant parties within your institution or organisation and encourage your students to get involved.

 

For more information on the conference please visit our website:  http://www.uws.edu.au/s4s/students_for_sustainability_conference

 

"I want to empower HOPE for my generation and students alike about the future concerns of a sustainable, just and ecologically resilient world. These issues are a growing concern for me and I want to start advocating innovative solutions against our futures greatest threats. I want all students to be leaders and be the voice of change. Join me at S4S to get your solutions heard and to take action!"

Justin Whittle
Student Coordinator, S4S Conference

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