Faculty of Veterinary Science
December 2016
Research News
In this issue
Welcome to the last research newsletter of the Faculty of Veterinary Science, and 2016. The structure of the new University Executive Research Committee has been announced and will be much smaller, reflecting the reduction in the number of Faculties from Jan 2017. I have been invited to remain in my role of ADR until June at the latest, and until then will continue to represent the Sydney School of Veterinary Science at Faculty (previously known as Divisional) Research meetings.
Update from SEG-R & DNS RC:
Discussions and workshops on RBG have been held by the office of the DVC-R, but at this stage no conclusions have been made. An approach that allows for support to be continued at all levels (University, Faculty, School, Researcher) is currently favoured. One change that will be made is that all Faculties and schools will be encouraged to use the same model.

I have recently attended a presentation from the RO on the indirect cost recovery process, as there are some changes being rolled out across the Faculty of Science. Whilst the 35% indirect cost recovery charged on all eligible research income has always been compulsory; there have been, on occasion, opportunities to negotiate and reduce this. Because the University has not been recovering anything like the required costs, they are now going to pursue this funding much more vigorously than in the past. It was highlighted that it goes to the school, not the research office. They are suggesting a whole new approach to this cost recovery, with a ‘pricing’ model rather than a costing model. They are also suggesting that there should not be a line in any budget saying “indirect cost recovery”; instead it should just be factored into the price of each item. They have created a budget calculator to help researchers work out these prices, and will be approaching schools to present on the details. We will schedule this for early next year. Researchers can also ask the RO for advice on how to handle the contract negotiations. They were also quick to point out that if you charge more than 35% you get to keep the extra. 

I understand that some of you will have concerns about whether this might price our research out of the market- I have the same concerns. I have found the best way to tackle this is to approach the Commercial Development and Industry Partnerships team and to talk to them directly about your specific situation.

Thank you to the researchers that have stepped in at the last minute to become panel members for the ARC ERA Engagement and Impact Pilot. I know you are all incredibly busy, so we are very grateful for this further commitment of your time.

The Australian Medical Research Future Fund strategies/priorities have been announced (Nov 10). Lots of areas are closely aligned with our goals at the University but we might need a bit more realignment in places. The DVCR noted that first rounds of funding would probably be on the basis of ministerial approval rather a competitive basis.

There is a review and ten-year strategic plan for Laboratory Animal Services strategic plan in the Camperdown precinct. The plan is to reduce numbers of facilities but increase capacity to and increase efficiencies/bring researchers together and a more dedicated space. Let me know if you think this may affect you and we can discuss further details.

There are some new opportunities available for industry collaborations. These include “Tech Vouchers”, which have been established to drive collaboration between NSW Small – Medium Enterprises and Boosting Business Innovation Program delivery partners (i.e. Universities). These are NSW government grants for seed funding or pilot projects. The idea is to then transition into CRC-P’s. They are worth up to $15,000 with matching funds. CDIP have also reminded me that they have smaller travel grants available for researchers to visit overseas partners and develop commercial and research opportunities. To find more details, click on the Commercial Development and Industry Partnerships link on the ‘Funding your Research’ tab of the Research Support page on the Intranet.

Finally, I want to thank you all for making my year as ADR so very rewarding as well as enjoyable. Thank you all for the incredible research you perform under extreme pressure, whilst also excelling at teaching, all the whilst battling increased class sizes and reduced budgets for everything. You should all be extraordinarily proud of what you have achieved this year, and I hope everyone is able to take some downtime before next it all starts again next year. Please turn your emails off! Have a wonderful, safe happy Christmas and New Year period and see you all in 2017.

All the best

Tash

Media Watch
  • Professor Paul McGreevy from the Faculty of Veterinary Science wrote an article published on The Conversation about Harness Racing Australia’s decision to end the use of whips in Australian racing. Professor McGreevy was also quoted in the Daily Telegraph about animal welfare concerns related to training dingoes.
    An article in the Sunday Tasmanian referenced research by Professor Paul McGreevy from the Faculty of Veterinary Science on the behaviour of different breeds of dogs, which is influenced by the shape of their skull.
  • A Bengal tiger with cataracts was operated on at the University of Sydney Veterinary Teaching Hospital, reported Daily Mail (UK).
  • A Bengal tiger with cataracts was operated on at the University of Sydney Veterinary Teaching Hospital, reported Channel 7 News (Sydney), Channel 9 News (Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Darwin), Huffington Post, Daily Mail, SBS Online, Gold Coast Bulletin, Courier Mail, Herald Sun, NT Newsand news.com.au.
  • The Huffington Postreferenced research by Dr Melissa Starling, from the Faculty of Veterinary Science, which revealed some dogs are more pessimistic than others.
  • 702 ABC Sydney spoke to Dr Camilla Whittington from the Faculty of Veterinary Science about her research on male seahorse pregnancies.
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  • PhD candidate Emma Peel from the School of Life and Environmental Sciences was interviewed on ABC Central Coast about new research that has proved Tasmanian Devil’s milk can kill some of the most deadly bacterial and fungal infections.
  • Taringa! (Argentina) and Popular Science (US) quoted PhD candidate Emma Peel from the School of Life and Environmental Sciences about new research that has proved Tasmanian Devil’s milk can kill some of the most deadly bacterial and fungal infections.
  • Dr Natasha Hamilton from the Faculty of Veterinary Science authored an article published in The Conversationabout the genetics of a champion thoroughbred horse in relation to the Melbourne Cup.
  • Yahoo (UK) quoted PhD candidate Emma Peel from the School of Life and Environmental Sciences about new research that has proved Tasmanian Devil’s milk can kill some of the most deadly bacterial and fungal infections.
  • The Sydney Morning Herald, Ageand Canberra Timesreported the University of Sydney has gained two out of three Australian L’Oreal-UNESCO For Women in Science fellowships. Dr Camilla Whittington from the Faculty of Veterinary Science and Dr Angela Crean from the School of Life and Environmental Sciences were profiled for the articles.
  • Live Science (US) quoted PhD candidate Emma Peel from the School of Life and Environmental Sciences about new research that has proved Tasmanian Devil’s milk can kill some of the most deadly bacterial and fungal infections.
  • Oriental Daily (Hong Kong) quoted PhD candidate Emma Peel from the School of Life and Environmental Sciences about new research that has proved Tasmanian Devil’s milk can kill some of the most deadly bacterial and fungal infections
  • IFL Science (US), Yahoo! (US, Japan), BBC (Indonesia), China Times, Malaysia Digest, Daily Express (UK) and Der Standard (Austria) quoted PhD candidate Emma Peel from the School of Life and Environmental Sciences about new research that has proved Tasmanian Devil’s milk can kill some of the most deadly bacterial and fungal infections.
  • The Guardian (UK), BBC (UK), Huffington Post (UK), CBS (US), Breitbart News (US), BBC (Indonesia), Duetsche Welle (Germany), MSN (Germany), RT (Russia), The Straits Times (Singapore), Eastday (China), The Standard (Hong Kong) and Yahoo! (New Zealand) quoted PhD candidate Emma Peel from the School of Life and Environmental Sciences about new research that has proved Tasmanian Devil’s milk can kill some of the most deadly bacterial and fungal infections.
  • The Guardian, Huffington Post, ABC Newcastle and 3AW Melbourne interviewed PhD candidate Emma Peel from the School of Life and Environmental Sciences about new research that has proved Tasmanian Devil’s milk can kill some of the most deadly bacterial and fungal infections. NBN News (Central Coast, Gold Coast) also reported on the research.
  • The Daily Mail (UK), the Times (UK), the Mirror (UK), CNN (US) and Gizmodo (India) quoted PhD candidate Emma Peel from the School of Life and Environmental Sciences about new research that has proved Tasmanian Devil’s milk can kill some of the most deadly bacterial and fungal infections.
  • PhD candidate Emma Peel from the School of Life and Environmental Sciences was interviewed on ABC (News 24, RN Drive, PM, 702 Sydney, 774 Melbourne, 666 Canberra, 891 Adelaide, 720 Perth, 105.7 Darwin, 936 Hobart, triple j), The Project on Channel 10, The Feed on SBS Two, 3AW Melbourne, 5AA Adelaide, 6PR Perth, 2GB Sydney, 2CC Canberra and Gizmodoabout new research that has proved Tasmanian Devil’s milk can kill some of the most deadly bacterial and fungal infections. The Hobart Mercuryand news.com.auquoted Professor Kathy Belov, Pro-Vice Chancellor (Global Engagement) about the research. Pedestrianalso reported on the study.
  • The Courier Mailquoted Professor Paul McGreevy from the Faculty of Veterinary Science about his study on the health complications common among small dog breeds
  • NewsLocalinterviewed Dr Jennie Mohler from the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences about the danger of snake bites in pets
  • Talking Lifestyleinterviewed Professor Paul McGreevy from the Faculty of Veterinary Science about the new Doglogbook app which helps pet owners track their dog’s health and combat problem behaviour.
  • 2UE interviewed Professor Paul McGreevy from the Faculty of Veterinary Science about the new Doglogbook app which aims to measure and optimise dog wellbeing.

ORCID iDs.... Are you ready?
Wiley Publishing has annouced it will require authors to provide ORCID iDs as part of the manuscript submission process.

The company joins a growing list of journals and publishers to make the commitment.

Over 500 Wiley journals using ScholarOne Manuscripts will now require the submitting author (only) to provide an ORCID identifier (iD) when submitting a manuscript
Have you created your ORCID iD, not sure if you need one.. read on
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Congratulations
Well done to the following:-
NHMRC grant awarded to Peter Bennett:-
  • Nano-X: A new class of cancer radiotherapy system; Keall P, Feain I, Mackie T, Prather P, Wright B, O'Brien R, Jackson M, Barton M, Bennett P, Thwaites D, Booth J, Crossing S, Baxi S, Downes S; National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)/Development Grants.
  • Nano-X, A smarter and smaller radiation therapy machine for transforming global access to cancer care. Feain I, Prather P, Keall P, Bennett P, Jackson M, Downes S, Shieh C-C, O’Brien R, Booth J, Tehei S, Hana S, Sokolov R, Coleman L. NSW Medical Devices Fund.

Research Awards to be annouced at the Faculty Christmas Party 15th December 2016....
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Funding available
Grants
Find below some of the opportunites that are available via Research Professional.
The Max Day Environmental Science Fellowship Award
Closing date : 12th December 2016
Grants in Herpetology Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, US.
Closing date: 15 Dec 2016

MLA RD & A Pre-Proposal Call  MLA invites preliminary proposals for its research, development and adoption projects addressing research, development and adoption priorities on sheep meat and grass-fed beef. Closing date:  23 Dec 2016

McGarvie Smith Institute  projects involving veterinary and related sciences, demonstrable benefit to the production livestock industries of NSW.
Closing date: 31 Dec 2016

Project grants, National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research, GB.
Closing date: 15 Jan 2017

AAS Regional Collaborations Program; prospective applicants are requested to contact David Boyd in advance of making an application.
Closing Date: 9:00am (AEDT) 16 January 2017

Control Tools and Technologies for Established Pest Animals and Weeds Program Projects must propose to develop a chemical, biological or physical control tool or technology to manage one or more established pest animals (excluding invertebrates) and/or weeds that are not native to Australia or a particular part of Australia.
Closing date: 23 Jan 2017

Industrial partnership awards Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, GB. 
Closing date: 24 Jan 2017

Stand-alone LINK  Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, GB.
Closing date: 24 Jan 2017

Priority Partnerships Collaboration Award - The University of Hong Kong, Applications must be lodged via email in accordance with the partnership guidelines.
Closing date: 31 Jan 2017

Australian Small Animal Veterinary Association, These support research into the causes, prevention and cure of disease in animals, particularly canines, felines and other companion animal species relevant to small animal veterinary practice.
Closing date: 6 Feb 2017

Australian Companion Animal Health Foundation 2017 - Details and application forms can be source from:- vetsci.adr@sydney.edu.au
Closing date: 6 Feb 2017

Vernon and Shirley Hill Foundation
have four international Canine Health Awards available:-
  • International Prize in Canine Health with a prize fund of £40,000
  •  International Lifetime Achievement Award with a Prize Fund of £10,000
  •  UK Student Inspiration Awards.There are two awards in this category, Undergraduate and Postgraduate, with prize funds of £5,000 and £10,000, respectively.                           Closing date  12 February 2017

Dept of Industry Innovation and Science - Citizen Science Grants
Citizen Science Grants is an element of the Inspiring Australia - Science Engagement Programme. It provides grants on a competitive basis to support community participation in scientific research projects that have a national impact.
Closing date  17 February 2017
ContactDavid Boyd.
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Animal Ethics
What is new at Animal Ethics?
Animal Welfare Veterinarian

This year AE have taken on a new Animal Welfare Veterinarian, Dr Shaun Miller. Information regarding Shaun can be found in the news section of the ARAT newsletter, September edition. Shaun is available to discuss any welfare concerns and is also available to provide a pre-review of animal ethics application.

Shaun’s email is resint.veterinarian@sydney.edu.au

Tissue sample
Tissue sampling can be a grey area when it comes to seeking approval and AE would like to try to make this easier for the research community. AE are currently writing procedures and guidelines about this. But the following should be able to assist in the meantime.
 
If the samples are taken as a normal veterinary procedure then this will not require a full ethics application and approval as they will not be taking anything more than what is routine veterinary care. For example, using residual blood. Our general rule for tissue use is as follows:
Activity involving only animal tissues requires review by a University AEC where:

  1. Animal tissues are to be used for teaching and research purposes; and
  2. Animals were alive when the tissues were removed.
    1. Where the tissue was removed as part of routine animal care, not related to research or teaching, this review can take the form of a notice of tissue sample use.
 Activity involving only animal tissues or cadavers does not require AEC review where:The tissues were collected from animals which were already dead; and
  1. Either the animals were not killed for the purposes of teaching or research; or
  2. The animals were killed for a teaching or research purpose already approved by an AEC and in a manner approved by the AEC.
 Therefore, if you require left over tissue / residual blood from a normal veterinary procedure, a full animal ethics approval is not required but a “Notification of tissue sample” is required. If additional tissue is being taken, for your research then a full AEC application will need to be completed.

Something that must be considered when seeking samples is the duty of care to the owner. This is not something covered by Animal Ethics but it is something which we hope researchers take into account.

When Animal Ethics Approval is required
There was a request to provide details about when animal ethics approval is required. I will look into providing a more detailed communication plan around this but please see the below as a quick reference.
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December Activites
OGTR - Call for submissions
Technical Review of the Gene Technology Regulations 2001 - call for submissions

The Gene Technology Regulator has initiated a technical review of the Gene Technology Regulations 2001 (the Regulations) to provide clarity about whether organisms developed using a range of new technologies are subject to regulation as genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and ensure that new technologies are regulated in a manner commensurate with the risks they pose.

The Gene Technology Regulator has initiated a technical review of the Gene Technology Regulations 2001 (the Regulations) to provide clarity about whether organisms developed using a range of new technologies are subject to regulation as genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and ensure that new technologies are regulated in a manner commensurate with the risks they pose.

The Office of the Gene Technology Regulator (OGTR) has prepared a Discussion Paper canvasing four options for how new technologies could be regulated, which includes consultation questions. 

The closing date for submissions to be lodged with the OGTR is 16 December 2016.




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Getting ready for 2017
Mark your calendars!
Taking cancer research at Sydney to the next level The University is seeking input to design new multidisciplinary university-wide initiatives focused on cancer, a national and global priority.

Preliminary call for abstracts for The Sixth SAADC Conference which will be held in Batu, Indonesia, from 16 to 19 October, 2017
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