STUDENT NEWS

WEDNESDAY 6 NOVEMBER 2013

Your chance to hear Daw Aung San Suu Kyi

We are thrilled to provide University of Sydney staff and students with a very special opportunity to hear Daw Aung San Suu Kyi speak at the Sydney Opera House on Wednesday 27 November 2013. 

One of the most significant political figures of our time, the Nobel Peace Prize winner will receive a prestigious honorary doctorate from the University in the Opera House's Concert Hall before answering questions from what is expected to be a sold-out audience.
We are thrilled to provide University of Sydney staff and students with a very special opportunity to hear Daw Aung San Suu Kyi speak at the Sydney Opera House on Wednesday 27 November 2013.  

One of the most significant political figures of our time, the Nobel Peace Prize winner will receive a prestigious honorary doctorate from the University in the Opera House's Concert Hall before answering questions from what is expected to be a sold-out audience. 

University staff and students will have priority access to a limited number of tickets to this event before they go on sale to the general public. You will be able to buy tickets from the Sydney Opera House websitePlease note this link will not be live until 9am on Thursday 7 November. The pre-sale period will run until 9am on Friday 8 November.  
Read a related story.

Share your inspiration to win

We're offering students the chance to WIN $500 worth of tickets to spend on an exciting line-up of Sydney Festival shows in January, including many on campus. Simply enter our Instagram competition and show us how Sydney inspires you! Find out more

Need startup funding? INCUBATE applications extended

Applications for INCUBATE's summer cycle have been extended till Sunday 10 November. Apply now for a $5,000 grant to turn your idea into a successful startup, or come along to the Startup Info Session on Thursday 7 November at 1pm.

Pedal power in action at Reel Food Night

Join the Youth Food Movement for an evening of conversation and film at a pedal-powered pop-up cinema in the warehouse surrounds of Pier 2/3 in Walsh Bay. To be held on 28 November, the fourth installment of the Reel Food Nights series, sponsored by the Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, will feature lively discussion from experts across the food system as they explore solutions to some of the planet's most pressing food issues. Find out more

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NOTICES

Essential exam info

Semester 2 exams begin next week. Preparing for the practical side of exams is important, the following checklist will help make your exams as smooth and calm as possible.
Semester 2 exams begin next week. Preparing for the practical side of exams is important, the following checklist will help make your exams as smooth and calm as possible.

To do in advance

Check your examination timetable, seat numbers and locations well in advance – don’t leave it to the day of your exam.

Check your calculator is an approved model. Please consult the policy if in any doubt. Students should be aware that the make and model details of all calculators (approved or not) used by candidates in examinations are now provided to examiners. 
 
If you have an exam clash and haven’t received an email about your arrangements, contact the Examination Office immediately.

Read the ‘rules to be observed by candidates for examinations.’ Note that if your exam is temporarily interrupted (for example, in the case of a fire alarm evacuation), you cannot talk to or make contact with other candidates, use your phone or consult your study materials.

To do on the day

Don’t forget your student ID card. (or some other form of photo ID). You may not be permitted to sit your examination without it.

Before leaving home, double check you have all the materials or equipment you need to complete your exams. Pack extra pens and extra pencils for multiple-choice exams.

Arrive on time. You may not enter an examination room once 30 minutes of writing time has elapsed. If you are late on the day you will not be permitted to sit the exam and supervisors will direct you to your examiner to make alternative arrangements.

Please enter and leave exam venues as quietly as possible so as not to disturb candidates in other rooms.

Do not attend your exams if you are ill. If you feel sick on the day of an exam, you should be aware that while the University Health Service will still treat emergency cases, there is no longer a ‘sick room’ for students to continue examinations already commenced. You should see your own doctor as soon as possible and apply through your faculty office for Special Consideration.

Leave your valuables at home. If they cannot be left at home, keep them on your person or under your desk during exams. In the past, there have been incidents of theft from bags left outside exam rooms. Students who have had items stolen from bags while sitting exams should call the Security Service on 9351 3333 immediately and, if possible, alert the presiding supervisor of their exam room. The University’s Security Service may notify the police of any theft.
 
Students should be aware that in addition to any action taken by the police against any student found to have stolen (or attempting to steal) the property of other students, the University may assess such conduct as misconduct in accordance with Chapter 8 of the University of Sydney By-law and take appropriate action against the student which may include expulsion, suspension or a severe reprimand.
 
Good luck!

Be the best you can be

Learn a little more about yourself and shape a personal development plan with a new intuitive self-assessment tool that has been designed to help boost your performance in exams. Find out more

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GET INVOLVED

Volunteer for research

We can't do research without your help. If you'd like to get involved, the following research studies need participants.

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EVENTS

 NOV  | Coming up at Sydney Ideas

Upcoming Sydney Ideas events include presentations about the catastrophic impacts of the release of cane toads in the 1930s, the ethics of refugee policy, the legacies of the Marquis de Lafayette and the mapping the minds of teenage girls.

Upcoming Sydney Ideas events include presentations about the catastrophic impacts of the release of cane toads in the 1930s, the ethics of refugee policy, the legacies of the Marquis de Lafayette and the mapping the minds of teenage girls.

11 NOV | Cane Toads: a tale of sugar, politics and flawed science

A Sydney University Press book launch

Queensland's sugar scientists released the cane toad, originally from Barbados, into cane fields in 1935 to control pests. What is the story behind this simple act that has had such catastrophic outcomes and what can we learn from it?

11 NOV | The Dispossessed: the ethics of refugee policy

Is there some point at which a democratic state is morally entitled to say to refugees, "we know that you face genuine and dire threats, but we have done enough. You are not our responsibility. We leave you to your fate.”? Canadian immigration scholar Joe Carens asks some confronting questions.

12 NOV | Hero and Villain: Lafayette's legacies

Americans have long hailed the Marquis de Lafayette (1757-1834) as an admirable figure, but in France he is seen by both the left and the right as an opportunist, a misguided dreamer, even a traitor. Art history scholar Laura Auricchio discusses how he attracted such disparate reputations.

13 NOV | 21st Century Medicine – mapping teenage minds

Professor Gin Malhi's neuroscience research group has investigated the minds of teenage girls using the latest and most sophisticated functional neuroimaging techniques and have managed to identify startling changes in the key brain regions that occur before the onset of any clinical problems.

 14 NOV  | In Search of Alexander the Great: Nicholson Museum lecture

Retrace the footsteps of Alexander the Great in a public lecture by Emeritus Professor Bob Milns AM in the Nicholson Museum.
Retrace the footsteps of Alexander the Great in a public lecture by Emeritus Professor Bob Milns AM in the Nicholson Museum.

The lecture will showcase some of the more significant – and unusual – places visited by Professor Miln in his tour of Macedonia and Turkey earlier this year, where he retraced Alexander’s invasion of the Persian Empire up to the Battle of Issus in 333 BC.

When: 6-8pm, Thursday 14 November 2013
Where: Nicholson Museum, The Quadrangle
Cost: $32 ($25 for Friends of the Nicholson Museum)

Find out more

 NOV  | Forum on urbanisation and health in China

Unprecedented economic growth and development in China over the past two decades and resultant rapid urbanisation has posed new social, environmental and public health challenges. Join our two-day forum, supported by the China Studies Centre and the Sydney School of Public Health, detailing these emerging issues of urbanisation and health in China.
Unprecedented economic growth and development in China over the past two decades and resultant rapid urbanisation has posed new social, environmental and public health challenges. Join our two-day forum, supported by the China Studies Centre and the Sydney School of Public Health, detailing these emerging issues of urbanisation and health in China.
 
When: 28-29 November 2013
Where: 28 November: New Law School Lecture Theatre 026; 29 November: Carslaw Lecture Theatre 350
Cost: Free, but please register for catering purposes
 
Find out more

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