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TUESDAY 23 OCTOBER 2012
NEWS
NHMRC Funding
A significant increase in funding for research in infectious diseases and for clinical trials underpinned Sydney Medical School’s success in National Health and Medical Research Council grants, announced on October 19.
A significant increase in funding for research in infectious diseases and for clinical trials underpinned Sydney Medical School’s success in National Health and Medical Research Council grants, announced on October 19.

In all, The University of Sydney was awarded 101 grants and fellowships, valued at $66 million. Of those, Sydney Medical School was awarded 87 grants and fellowships. In infectious diseases, total funding secured was in excess of $11 million, said Professor Tania Sorrell, head of the Sydney Emerging Infections and Biosecurity Institute (SEIB) and was a clear example of the quality of the research. Among the 68 project grants, Professor Guy Marks (Central Clinical School) and Professor Bruce Neal (George Institute) each secured $3.4 million – Guy Marks for his work in tuberculosis and Bruce Neal to fund a trial to determine the effects of salt reduction on vascular disease.

The announcement of funding was made by the Minister for Health, the Hon Tanya Plibersek and Professor Warwick Anderson, Chief Executive of the NHMRC at the University of Sydney. The full list of grant outcomes listed below is also available on the Sydney Medical School website.
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Internships for International Medical Students
With as many as 100 graduating international medical students in NSW without an intern placement for 2013, domestic and international medical students across all years of the program have staged a public protest in Sydney’s Taylor Square.
With as many as 100 graduating international medical students in NSW without an intern placement for 2013, domestic and international medical students across all years of the program have staged a public protest in Sydney’s Taylor Square.

The Universities of Sydney and NSW both have in excess of 40 international students graduating this year, with international students also graduating from Newcastle and Wollongong.   The protest was covered by a number of media outlets including the Sydney Morning Herald (22.10.2012)

Staff who wish to support the the students can find out more information on the Australian Medical Students Assocation website.

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FELLOWSHIPS AND RESEARCH FUNDING
Clinical Research Fellowship at The Northern Translational Cancer Research Unit (NTCRU)
The Northern Translational Cancer Research Unit (NTCRU) has announced its revised Clinical Research Fellowship. The fellowship offers up to $100,000 for salary support only over a 12 month period to conduct translational cancer research as part of the NTCRU, with a travel component to an international or national research site.

The Northern Translational Cancer Research Unit (NTCRU) has announced its revised Clinical Research Fellowship. The fellowship offers up to $100,000 for salary support only over a 12 month period to conduct translational cancer research as part of the NTCRU, with a travel component to an international or national research site.

The NTCRU Clinical Research Fellow will be able to travel to a nominated research site overseas or interstate for up to 6 months of the 12 month fellowship, to learn a new research technique or be immersed in an advanced research program. Candidates wishing to incorporate a period of research at a host institution will need to demonstrate that this period will result in them importing advanced research skills and establishing collaborations which will build long term research capacity in the NTCRU. Candidates who plan to complete the full 12 month fellowship locally at a NTCRU site are equally eligible to apply.

The Application Guidelines document contains full details on eligibility criteria, conditions of the award and the required format for applications. Applications must be submitted by e-mail in PDF form to the Royal North Shore Hospital Research Business Unit: research@nsccahs.health.nsw.gov.au. The closing date for applications is Friday, 9th November 2012.

For more information, contact Anne Warby anne.warby@sydney.edu.au
Sydney Medical School Foundation - research funds available for anorexia nervosa
Sydney Medical School Foundation is now calling for applications for projects researching anorexia nervosa. The grant is made possible through the Jenny Truman Memorial Fund for Anorexia Nervosa held by the Foundation, and provides $36,819 for one or more research projects. Applications close  9 November 2012.
Sydney Medical School Foundation is now calling for applications for projects researching anorexia nervosa. The grant is made possible through the Jenny Truman Memorial Fund for Anorexia Nervosa held by the Foundation, and provides $36,819 for one or more research projects. Applications close  9 November 2012.

Please visit the Sydney Medical School Foundation website for details on how to apply.
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CONFERENCES AND SEMINARS
 29 OCT    |  
Seminar - Health and Social harms of Coal Mining in Local Communities: Spotlight on the Hunter
This seminar will discuss the findings of the recent report by the University of Sydney’s Health and Sustainability Unit for Beyond Zero Emissions on local and international evidence about health and social impacts of coal extraction and combustion on people in nearby communities. An expert panel will look at implications for health and public policy.
This seminar will discuss the findings of the recent report by the University of Sydney’s Health and Sustainability Unit for Beyond Zero Emissions on local and international evidence about health and social impacts of coal extraction and combustion on people in nearby communities. An expert panel will look at implications for health and public policy.

DATE: Monday October 29
TIME: 5.30-7pm
WHERE: Medical Foundation Auditorium, 92-94 Parramatta Rd Camperdown
MORE INFO: Flyer (PDF)
RSVP: essential to Kerry.jenson@sydney.edu.au or 02 9036 3075
 2 NOV    |  
Statistical research seminar – Bias due to differential attrition: what matters and what may not
Dr Melanie Bell,  biostatistician for the Psycho-Oncology Co-Operative Research Group and its Quality of Life Office, The University of Sydney, will talk about Bias due to differential attrition.
Dr Melanie Bell,  biostatistician for the Psycho-Oncology Co-Operative Research Group and its Quality of Life Office, The University of Sydney, will talk about Bias due to differential attrition.

DATE: November 2
TIME: 11am
WHERE: The George Institute, Level 10 – King George V Building, 83-117 Missenden Road Camperdown NSW 2050 Australia.
MORE INFO: Flyer (PDF)

Attrition in longitudinal randomized trials is common, and threatens validity of results, particularly in patient reported outcomes like quality of life. When attrition rates differ between treatment arms it is sometimes called differential attrition. The implications of differential attrition are often misunderstood: some believe that if attrition rates are similar between study arms estimated treatment effects will be unbiased. Or, if differential attrition occurs, results are biased. This study demonstrates that these beliefs are false. 

Psycho-Oncology Co-Operative Research Group is one of 13 cancer trials groups in Australia. Dr Bell’s research focus is on design and analysis of quality of life (QoL) and other psychosocial outcomes, in particular, methods for handling missing data in longitudinal studies. Additionally, she is involved in research in the design and analysis of cluster randomized trials, and on the quality of the design and analysis of psycho-oncology trials.
 9 NOV    |  
Seven years of Alzheimers Research at BMRI
Professor JÜRGEN GÖTZ will present this session which covers seven years of research at the BMRI.
Professor JÜRGEN GÖTZ will present this session which covers seven years of research at the BMRI.

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an incurable disease that affects a growing ageing population. Recent clinical strategies include vaccinations and the modulation of the formation, aggregation and clearance of proteins such as Aβ and tau both of which form insoluble deposits. Professor Gotz will discuss how we employed transgenic mouse models to identify underlying pathomechanisms and develop tailored treatment strategies. He will present data that identifies mitochondrial dysfunction as a key mechanism in neurodegeneration. Professor Gotz has recently moved to the Centre for Ageing Dementia Research, Queensland brain Institute, University of Queensland.

DATE; 3:30 – 4:30 pm Friday 9th November,
TIME: 3.30-4.30pm
WHERE: Level 5 Lecture Theatre, 94 Mallett St, Camperdown
MORE INFO AND TO REGISTER: SCINAPPS@BRAIN & MIND RESEARCH INSTITUTE

SCIENCE NEUROLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY/PSYCHOLOGY SEMINARS@BMRI For further information contact wayne.reid@sydney.edu.au
 16 NOV    |  
Positive Computing: How can technology support wellbeing?
A discussion on multidisciplinary approaches to developing new technologies that can support wellbeing with Associate Professor Rafael Calvo, School of Electrical and Information Engineering, University of Sydney.
A discussion on multidisciplinary approaches to developing new technologies that can support wellbeing with Associate Professor Rafael Calvo, School of Electrical and Information Engineering, University of Sydney.

As computers are gradually embedded into all the life experiences that shape us, isn’t it our responsibility to expect more from the way they impact our lives? This seminar will present an interdisciplinary approach to developing technology that positively influences wellbeing, in its broader sense. Our work includes new forms of e-therapy interventions as well as strategies for including wellbeing considerations into the design of all software applications. I will cover new evidence of the multiple ways in which technology is changing the way we feel, think and behave. The literature on wellbeing coming from psychologists and educational researchers is then used to describe a framework for developing digital experiences that support wellbeing.

WHEN: Friday 16th November, 2012
TIME: 3.30-4.30pm
WHERE: Level 5 Lecture Theatre, 94 Mallett St, Camperdown
MORE INFO: SCINAPPS@BRAIN & MIND RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Science neurology and Psychiatry/Psychology Seminars
Contact wayne.reid@sydney.edu.au
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CONGRATULATIONS TO...
 AWARDS    |  
Elizabeth Elliott, Professor of Paediatrics and Child Health
Elizabeth Elliott, Professor of Paediatrics and Child Health, Head of the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit at the Kids Research Institute at the Children's Hospital at Westmead, for being recognised with a 100 Women of Influence Award by The Australian Financial Review and Westpac.
Elizabeth Elliott, Professor of Paediatrics and Child Health, Head of the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit at the Kids Research Institute at the Children's Hospital at Westmead, for being recognised with a 100 Women of Influence Award by The Australian Financial Review and Westpac.

More than 350 women were nominated for these prestigious awards. The finalists were selected from across the economy by a panel of leading Australians. Those chosen have been successful in their careers and influential in shaping a bold and diverse future for Australia.

Full story

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John Harris, Professor of Vascular Surgery, Central Clinical School
John Harris, Professor of Vascular Surgery, Central Clinical School who has been awarded ESR Hughes Award for distinguished contributions to surgery at RACS ASM in Kuala Lumpur.
John Harris, Professor of Vascular Surgery, Central Clinical School who has been awarded ESR Hughes Award for distinguished contributions to surgery at RACS ASM in Kuala Lumpur.

Inaugurated in 1998, the ESR Hughes Award is designed to recognise distinguished contributions to surgery by Fellows of the College and others. It was created in recognition of the outstanding contributions to surgery by Professor Sir Edward Hughes. The sole criterion for the Award is distinguished contributions to surgery.
Angela Littleford, PhD student in the Menzies Centre
Angela Littleford, a PhD student in the Menzies Centre, supervised by Associate Professor James Gillespie, who was announced as the South Australian state winner of the Nokia Business Innovation Award in at  the 2012 Telstra Business Women’s Awards.
Angela Littleford, a PhD student in the Menzies Centre, supervised by Associate Professor James Gillespie, who was announced as the South Australian state winner of the Nokia Business Innovation Award in at  the 2012 Telstra Business Women’s Awards.

The award recognises a successful innovation within a business or workplace. The project is a practical example of translation of research. Angela’s PhD research  examines models of care that are best practice for older people with chronic disease, and in her role in SA she has used her research to help change community-based health services across the state. As the Chief Operating Officer with the Royal District Nursing Service, she has overseen the introduction of standardised clinical pathways for patients, traditionally reserved for people requiring acute health care, such as surgery. These reforms ensure consistency and continuity of care, resulting in better healing rates. The new model includes virtual health programs and telephone health support backed by a 24-hour call centre to help people heal at home and avoid institutional care. She will now go on to the National Awards which will be announced at the national presentation dinner in Sydney on 21 November 2012.

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Nur Afrainin Syah, PhD student
Nur Afrainin Syah et al, who was the winner of Australia Awards Indonesia Research Poster Competition with a poster based on her PhD studies:  Strengthening Professional Identity: The Experience of Indonesia General Practitioners.
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CONTENTS
News
Fellowships and Research Funding
Conferences and Seminars
Congratulations to...
Microsearch Foundation Concert
Sydney Medical School online
MICROSEARCH FOUNDATION CONCERT
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Talented Australian concert pianist Kathryn Selby will perform with students of the Bachelor of Music Studies and MBBS combined degree at the Microsearch Foundation of Australia concert, held in The Great Hall on November 4.
Talented Australian concert pianist Kathryn Selby will perform at the Microsearch Foundation of Australia concert, held in The Great Hall on November 4. Ms Selby’s will be assisted by students in the Sydney Medical School and Sydney Conservatorium of Music, Music Medicine program. Funds raised will support research to improve outcomes of microsurgical procedures.  The Microsearch Foundation of Australia was established to promote the training of young surgeons in the techniques of microsurgery and supports research in the science that underpins microsurgery.

WHEN: Sunday 4 November, 3.30-5.30pm

WHERE: The Great Hall, University of Sydney

FOR MORE INFO:
Microsearch Foundation


TO BOOK TICKETS:
Seymour Centre Box Office


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